9 Songs, 52 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This New York City–based group has gotten a lot of recognition in recent years, with band and individual members winning local and national polls. Red Hot is its sixth album and shows it expanding from a quartet to a septet lineup. Here, the quirky crew digs into jazz of the ‘20 and ‘30s for inspiration; the resulting music sounds like early Louis Armstrong diced and sliced by The Art Ensemble of Chicago. MOPDTK has long trafficked in sometimes-jolting eclecticism, with different albums having different aesthetic touchstones. Yet much of the material is written by bassist/bandleader Moppa Elliott, who meticulously maps out the tunes while leaving room for his bandmates to solo. Keep an ear out for bass trombonist David Taylor and the edgy electro-acoustic playing of banjo player Brandon Seabrook in particular. The openers—“The Shickshinny Shimmy” and “Zelienople”—have that hot-jazz swing feel carried on playful horn charts. The band dives into early-style blues on “Gum Stump” and avant-garde cabaret on “King of Prussia.” This should work for fans of Raymond Scott, John Lurie, or Rahsaan Roland Kirk at their most playful.

EDITORS’ NOTES

This New York City–based group has gotten a lot of recognition in recent years, with band and individual members winning local and national polls. Red Hot is its sixth album and shows it expanding from a quartet to a septet lineup. Here, the quirky crew digs into jazz of the ‘20 and ‘30s for inspiration; the resulting music sounds like early Louis Armstrong diced and sliced by The Art Ensemble of Chicago. MOPDTK has long trafficked in sometimes-jolting eclecticism, with different albums having different aesthetic touchstones. Yet much of the material is written by bassist/bandleader Moppa Elliott, who meticulously maps out the tunes while leaving room for his bandmates to solo. Keep an ear out for bass trombonist David Taylor and the edgy electro-acoustic playing of banjo player Brandon Seabrook in particular. The openers—“The Shickshinny Shimmy” and “Zelienople”—have that hot-jazz swing feel carried on playful horn charts. The band dives into early-style blues on “Gum Stump” and avant-garde cabaret on “King of Prussia.” This should work for fans of Raymond Scott, John Lurie, or Rahsaan Roland Kirk at their most playful.

TITLE TIME
5:23
6:38
5:00
8:30
5:39
5:38
6:33
6:33
2:40

About Mostly Other People Do The Killing

The jazz quartet Mostly Other People Do the Killing play a dense, sometimes frenzied version of the music that incorporates the genre’s entire history--from swing to free jazz--into clever, exuberant compositions. The group members were all educated in jazz conservatories, which is evident in their dazzling technical displays and their encyclopedic, postmodern take on jazz, both irreverent and deeply respectful at once. Their self-titled debut unveiled their self-proclaimed “dada-jazz,” while their sophomore release, 2007’s SHAMOKIN!!! found the group continuing to deconstruct everything from soul-jazz to bossa nova to funk to bop. The group performs regularly in New York City (including their native Long Island), and elsewhere.

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