Red Night by The Hundred In the Hands on Apple Music

10 Songs

EDITORS’ NOTES

While The Hundred in the Hands has muted the abrasive electronic flourishes that peppered its eponymous debut album in 2010, Red Night still abounds with the dramatic urgency of '80s goth rock and post-punk. The Brooklyn duo of Jason Friedman and Eleanore Everdell proudly wear past influences while moving forward. “Empty Stations” opens with drum machine beats that recall those of classic industrial bands like Front 242 or Nitzer Ebb. As the rhythm gains momentum, Everdell sings a bewitching performance, sounding like she’s channeling a young Siouxsie Sioux. Under slower tempos and ghostly electronic flourishes, her witchy wails taper down to a near-whisper in the following “Recognize.” The standout song “Come with Me” is easily the catchiest Hundred in the Hands song to date. While the chilling synth tones and tribal percussion recall the days of clove cigarettes and crepe-soled creeper footwear, the fetching melodies display a pop sophistication rarely heard since Broadcast’s 2005 album Tender Buttons. Everdell’s singing on the title track even sounds like a tribute to Broadcast's late Trish Keenan. 

EDITORS’ NOTES

While The Hundred in the Hands has muted the abrasive electronic flourishes that peppered its eponymous debut album in 2010, Red Night still abounds with the dramatic urgency of '80s goth rock and post-punk. The Brooklyn duo of Jason Friedman and Eleanore Everdell proudly wear past influences while moving forward. “Empty Stations” opens with drum machine beats that recall those of classic industrial bands like Front 242 or Nitzer Ebb. As the rhythm gains momentum, Everdell sings a bewitching performance, sounding like she’s channeling a young Siouxsie Sioux. Under slower tempos and ghostly electronic flourishes, her witchy wails taper down to a near-whisper in the following “Recognize.” The standout song “Come with Me” is easily the catchiest Hundred in the Hands song to date. While the chilling synth tones and tribal percussion recall the days of clove cigarettes and crepe-soled creeper footwear, the fetching melodies display a pop sophistication rarely heard since Broadcast’s 2005 album Tender Buttons. Everdell’s singing on the title track even sounds like a tribute to Broadcast's late Trish Keenan. 

TITLE TIME
5:28
4:27
3:10
5:59
4:23
4:03
4:25
4:15
6:16
4:17

About The Hundred In the Hands

Named after the phrase the Lakota Nation gave to the Fetterman Battle/Massacre of 1866 in Wyoming -- in which Crazy Horse led his warriors to a victory that resulted in the death of 100 white soldiers -- the Hundred in the Hands fuses synth pop with post-punk and dream pop elements, making for a sound that’s equally danceable and dreamy. The Brooklyn-based duo of Jason Friedman and Eleanore Everdell balance their duties with Friedman handling guitars and beats and Everdell providing vocals and keyboards. The pair played some gigs in London that caught the attention of Warp Records, who signed the Hundred in the Hands and released their debut single Undressed in Dresden in April 2010. An EP, This Desert, followed in May. Their full-length, self-titled debut album arrived that autumn. The duo went for a softer, more electronic approach on their second album, 2012's Red Night. ~ Heather Phares

  • ORIGIN
    Brooklyn, NY

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