12 Songs, 47 Minutes

TITLE TIME
3:09
4:02
4:11
3:25
3:57
3:05
6:09
2:57
3:32
4:53
4:20
4:01

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5

49 Ratings

49 Ratings

Finally here!

Sting zorga king of bees

Such a great artist, it's about time this has been put on here. Can't wait for more!

The Album That Taught Me Respect for Electronic Music

FringBirdAloha

I am a lifelong classical and jazz musician who has always had a fondness for electronic sounds but was majorly turned off by most of the music and composers out there, as most of it seemed like garbage recycled from the radio with Garageband drum beats played over them. I always said, “Nothing modern will ever be as genius as Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms or John Coltrane”.

Then I heard a song called “Resonance” from this album in an internet video. My life changed forever that day. I bought the album and listened to it from first song to last song without any sort of break. I have never been on a journey like this with modern music. The sounds are lush, the beats are very groovy and crunchy. And they really lead you to another place.

I am totally and emotionally attached to these albums the same as I am to Pink Floyd or Bill Evans. If I had to live on a deserted island, it would be extremely difficult to live without this album in my life. If you were to ask me how much this album is worth to me, I could say with a straight face $200.00

I finally got Resonance

dlangwhat

lov it

About Home

Lo-fi pop outfit Home formed in Tampa, Florida in the early '90s around the core of guitarist/vocalist Andrew Deutsch, keyboardist/vocalist Eric Morrison, and bassist/vocalist Brad Truax. After gaining a local following, the group began self-recording a series of eight cassettes -- titled I through VIII -- available only at a handful of Tampa-area stores and released on Home's own Screw Music Forever label. The tapes eventually earned the group a contract with the indie label Relativity, which issued IX in 1995; following the album's release, however, Relativity switched formats from rock to urban, allowing Home to find a new label. Instead, they found two -- while Jet Set expressed an interest in their more pop-oriented material, Emperor Jones latched onto the band's more experimental work. After recording with drummers Bill Bowman and Chuck Stephens, in 1996 Home issued two separate releases, X on Emperor Jones and Elf: Gulf Bore Waltz on Jet Set; a move to New York followed, as did the addition of permanent drummer Chris Sturgeon. Netherregions followed in 1998, and a year later Home returned with XIV. ~ Jason Ankeny

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