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Through Being Cool

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Album Review

Possessing a fiery dynamism lacking in their debut Can't Slow Down, Saves the Day's sophomore release on Equal Vision is an emocore classic. More anxious than emo godfathers Get Up Kids, Saves the Day opted for punchier production and faster tempos to provide a backdrop for singer Chris Conley's romantic teen declarations. True to the genre Conley helped define, his lyrics walk a thin sentimental wire. Just when the stories lose balance, leaning toward the obvious, sappy, or both, Conley pulls it together with plain-spoken honesty, as in "Third Engine" when he describes seeing his long-distance love in the face of another girl while riding a train: "I looked out past her cheeks/Through the glass-light conduit/But the sun had sank already/Disappeared into New Jersey/Oh, why don't they have phones on these things." Conley's disclosures resonate wildly with his teen audience — validating their shallow, but still open wounds — while the band's tightly wound arrangements gyrate around his language of casual suffering. Highlights of this most elevated combination include the melodic, quick-paced "My Sweet Fracture" and "The Last I Told You." Ending Through Being Cool with the metallic "Banned From the Back Porch," Saves the Day toys with expectation, revealing an eagerness to explore outside the emocore form that is all but mastered on this 1999 release.

Customer Reviews

Best Pop-Punk Album ever

Saves The Day are the founding fathers of emo pop punk and they really show it with this album. Chris Conleys emotionaly charged lyrics are just amazing, the guitar riffs are simple yet catchy, the drums are oh so powerful. Banned From the Back Porch, The Last Lie I Told and Holly Hox Forget Me Not are three of my all time favorite STD songs. This album is a must have!

all time favorite!

I bought this CD a while back in 01 and always has been one of my favorites! must have in my book.

Absolute Classic

The two other comments that were also made in 2012 speaks to how great this album is. Pop this sucker in and transform back to 2000. This was the soundtrack to my life sophomore year in high school.


Formed: 1994 in Princeton, NJ

Genre: Alternative

Years Active: '90s, '00s, '10s

Perfecting their power pop rock since the mid-'90s, New Jersey's Saves the Day call it like it is. They refrain from characteristic pogo-bouncing anthems for their own quirky post-punk and energetic live shows, influencing a new school of emo/punk bands along the way. The first incarnation of Saves the Day happened when singer/songwriter Chris Conley was only 13, and the band was first called Indifference and, later, Seffler. A name change to their current moniker, taken from a lyric from the Farside...
Full Bio