13 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Apocalypse Now and One from the Heart may have derailed Francis Coppola’s ambitious plans for reinventing Hollywood, but nothing could quell his restless, creative spirit, as his stark, 1983 rendering of S.E. Hinton’s book/screenplay — and the highly unusual musical score it inspired — so ably attest. This rhythmic cocktail by Stewart Copeland allowed the Police drummer to vent a good deal of the creative sensibilities the band’s success had so often thwarted, yielding music that’s at once sparely oblique, quaintly charming and deftly jazzy. With a true percussionist’s sense of nervous invention, Copeland frequently stepped from behind his drum kit to forge the propulsive atmospherics of his score from piano, acoustic guitars, found objects, a typewriter and quite possibly even the kitchen sink. “Don’t Box Me In,” Copeland’s opening collaboration with former Wall of Voodoo singer Stan Ridgway, may have been a moderate new-wave chart success, yet sacrifices none of the stark, angular minimalism that the drummer brought to his score. “Unique” is an overused adjective in judging music; here it’s simply the one that fits best.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Apocalypse Now and One from the Heart may have derailed Francis Coppola’s ambitious plans for reinventing Hollywood, but nothing could quell his restless, creative spirit, as his stark, 1983 rendering of S.E. Hinton’s book/screenplay — and the highly unusual musical score it inspired — so ably attest. This rhythmic cocktail by Stewart Copeland allowed the Police drummer to vent a good deal of the creative sensibilities the band’s success had so often thwarted, yielding music that’s at once sparely oblique, quaintly charming and deftly jazzy. With a true percussionist’s sense of nervous invention, Copeland frequently stepped from behind his drum kit to forge the propulsive atmospherics of his score from piano, acoustic guitars, found objects, a typewriter and quite possibly even the kitchen sink. “Don’t Box Me In,” Copeland’s opening collaboration with former Wall of Voodoo singer Stan Ridgway, may have been a moderate new-wave chart success, yet sacrifices none of the stark, angular minimalism that the drummer brought to his score. “Unique” is an overused adjective in judging music; here it’s simply the one that fits best.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
22 Ratings
22 Ratings
R&SMcCain ,

Stewart Copeland's Rumble fish

INHO the best drummer ever, SC's rumblefish has a depth that emerges after time - it's something very special, incorporating all kinds of rhythms that drive him. Give it a shot - anybody know where he is now or ehat he;s up to? A true talent, SC opened my mind to non-traditional song structures and rhythms. He and Eno should meet. Or have they?

spyguy2596 ,

3x

Great book, great movie, great soundtrack...

TheEdMon ,

Still no Klark Kent

I've been searching and searching for Stewart's first solo project, Klark Kent. I got it as an EP in the early eighties, 10" green vinyl, and a sound that was unique. I still haven't been able to find a digital copy.

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