13 Songs, 54 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Killers’ fifth album arrived amid reports of the band attempting to heal their rifts in counseling sessions. In those circumstances, it’s remarkable how liberated and inspired Wonderful Wonderful sounds, whether they’re skewering macho culture on a spiky disco stomp (“The Man”), accelerating through open-road rock (“Run for Cover”), or adapting a Brian Eno instrumental into an emotive ballad (“Some Kind of Love”). It’s also their most personal record to date, with Brandon Flowers candidly addressing his wife’s depression on “Rut” and striving to remain invincible in his kids’ eyes on “Tyson vs. Douglas.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Killers’ fifth album arrived amid reports of the band attempting to heal their rifts in counseling sessions. In those circumstances, it’s remarkable how liberated and inspired Wonderful Wonderful sounds, whether they’re skewering macho culture on a spiky disco stomp (“The Man”), accelerating through open-road rock (“Run for Cover”), or adapting a Brian Eno instrumental into an emotive ballad (“Some Kind of Love”). It’s also their most personal record to date, with Brandon Flowers candidly addressing his wife’s depression on “Rut” and striving to remain invincible in his kids’ eyes on “Tyson vs. Douglas.”

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