10 Songs, 44 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With Atlantic Crossing, Rod Stewart headed to America and hooked up with legendary Atlantic Records R&B producer Tom Dowd to try a new attack of sleeker soul and pop-rock. The ‘70s were changing and it was time to replace the rough-and-tumble urgency of his folk-based hard rock with smoother rhythms, horns, and a brighter sound than his audience was used to. The Muscle Shoals-rooted musicians here know their stuff inside-out and crank through with an almost mechanical precision. “All In the Name of Rock ‘n’ Roll” features plenty of blazing guitar and tight-grooved propulsion, yet it lacks the soul that Stewart brings to “I Don’t Want To Talk About It,” “Three Time Loser,” and the Holland-Holland-Dozier classic “This Old Heart of Mine.” Dobie Gray’s “Drift Away” fits seamlessly with Dowd’s radio-ready schematic and Stewart sounds fairly comfortable in his new surroundings, if not completely settled. Like many late-‘60s-early ‘70s troubadours, Stewart was experiencing a period of transition.

EDITORS’ NOTES

With Atlantic Crossing, Rod Stewart headed to America and hooked up with legendary Atlantic Records R&B producer Tom Dowd to try a new attack of sleeker soul and pop-rock. The ‘70s were changing and it was time to replace the rough-and-tumble urgency of his folk-based hard rock with smoother rhythms, horns, and a brighter sound than his audience was used to. The Muscle Shoals-rooted musicians here know their stuff inside-out and crank through with an almost mechanical precision. “All In the Name of Rock ‘n’ Roll” features plenty of blazing guitar and tight-grooved propulsion, yet it lacks the soul that Stewart brings to “I Don’t Want To Talk About It,” “Three Time Loser,” and the Holland-Holland-Dozier classic “This Old Heart of Mine.” Dobie Gray’s “Drift Away” fits seamlessly with Dowd’s radio-ready schematic and Stewart sounds fairly comfortable in his new surroundings, if not completely settled. Like many late-‘60s-early ‘70s troubadours, Stewart was experiencing a period of transition.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
26 Ratings
26 Ratings
DMon ,

Don't Forget Danny

Decent Rod Stewart but it was his LAST effort at rock 'n roll.
Please note that "I Don't Want To Talk About It" is a moderate to good slow one ( I like it ) by Rod but written by Danny Whitten of Crazy Horse fame. Danny was big before pairing up with Neil Young ( and sadly becoming the subject of "The Needle and the Damage Done"). The song was released on the 1971 Crazy Horse debut (no Neil ) and although much diifferent than the music here is nonetheless a great album.

Nodlem ,

Rod's last hurrah

No this album is not as good as his Mercury recordings or even some of the Jeff Beck stuff. This is the last album before Rod tumbled down the pop/disco hole never to return to rock and roll. The effort is good and the muscians are strong. This is a good addition to a Rod Stewart catalog.

muddy.water.dragon ,

Not my cup of tea

Especially considering the vital tracks Rod Stewart had laid down previous to this album. It's a good album if you're not praying for something harder, and it's got to be hard to be good IMHO. Rod Stewart was moving in another direction with this album. I'd stick with her earlier disks if I were you. This album is just too soft easy-listening to show up on my radar. The orchestral arrangements on this album make my flesh crawl. Stay hungry, Rod. Stay hungry.

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