42 Songs, 2 Hours 34 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though brief, Doug Sahm’s tenure at Atlantic was a peak in the storied musician’s career. Wielding equal fervor for jazz, R&B and rock ‘n’ roll, Sahm reconstituted Atlantic’s recorded legacy while reemphasizing the individualistic, iconoclastic nature of American music culture. Sahm invited everyone to the party: Dr. John, Bob Dylan, David “Fathead” Newman, and David Bromberg, in addition to his trusty cast of San Antonio stalwarts. The proceedings are at once monumental and totally freewheeling. Doug tosses off wonderful renditions of Bob Dylan’s “Wallflower,” Bob Wills’ “Faded Love” and Willie Nelson’s “Me and Paul,” and also slips in several classic originals, including “Texas Tornado,” “Juan Mendoza” and “Nitty Gritty.” 1973’s Doug Sahm & Band (contained on the first half of this program) is more of a traveling family jam, while 1974’s Texas Tornado is a downhome South Texas affair, but the albums easily blend together. The spontaneous nature of recording created a wealth of outtakes, the best of which is Doug’s back-porch rendering of the 1950s country hit “From a Jack to a King.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though brief, Doug Sahm’s tenure at Atlantic was a peak in the storied musician’s career. Wielding equal fervor for jazz, R&B and rock ‘n’ roll, Sahm reconstituted Atlantic’s recorded legacy while reemphasizing the individualistic, iconoclastic nature of American music culture. Sahm invited everyone to the party: Dr. John, Bob Dylan, David “Fathead” Newman, and David Bromberg, in addition to his trusty cast of San Antonio stalwarts. The proceedings are at once monumental and totally freewheeling. Doug tosses off wonderful renditions of Bob Dylan’s “Wallflower,” Bob Wills’ “Faded Love” and Willie Nelson’s “Me and Paul,” and also slips in several classic originals, including “Texas Tornado,” “Juan Mendoza” and “Nitty Gritty.” 1973’s Doug Sahm & Band (contained on the first half of this program) is more of a traveling family jam, while 1974’s Texas Tornado is a downhome South Texas affair, but the albums easily blend together. The spontaneous nature of recording created a wealth of outtakes, the best of which is Doug’s back-porch rendering of the 1950s country hit “From a Jack to a King.”

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