14 Songs, 58 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Her second compilation from 2007 (the first one being Sara Evans: The Early Years), delivers four bonus songs in addition to the other ten chart toppers. The first two newbies are radio ready singles. "As If" is an undeniably catchy insta-hit with driving rhythms and upbeat melodies. "Love You With All My Heart" (co-written by her brother Matt) is a thoughtfully constructed number that leans on airwave friendly balladry and an effectively sentimental narrative. The other two bonus songs are deeply rooted in the kind of new traditional country that oozed from her gorgeous 1997 debut Three Chords And The Truth (from which no songs appear here, unfortunately). "Pray For You" muses on motherly love with gentle back porch picking and harmonies sweeter than southern tea, and the rich wooden tones of old school country instrumentation. Spunky fiddles spark up "Some Things Never Change," a steel guitar engagement that rocks and slides like TNT era Tanya Tucker with universal working woman lyrics akin to Dolly Parton's "9 to 5." And yes, all the smash hits sandwiched in between are sequenced to make for a truly satisfying listen.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Her second compilation from 2007 (the first one being Sara Evans: The Early Years), delivers four bonus songs in addition to the other ten chart toppers. The first two newbies are radio ready singles. "As If" is an undeniably catchy insta-hit with driving rhythms and upbeat melodies. "Love You With All My Heart" (co-written by her brother Matt) is a thoughtfully constructed number that leans on airwave friendly balladry and an effectively sentimental narrative. The other two bonus songs are deeply rooted in the kind of new traditional country that oozed from her gorgeous 1997 debut Three Chords And The Truth (from which no songs appear here, unfortunately). "Pray For You" muses on motherly love with gentle back porch picking and harmonies sweeter than southern tea, and the rich wooden tones of old school country instrumentation. Spunky fiddles spark up "Some Things Never Change," a steel guitar engagement that rocks and slides like TNT era Tanya Tucker with universal working woman lyrics akin to Dolly Parton's "9 to 5." And yes, all the smash hits sandwiched in between are sequenced to make for a truly satisfying listen.

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