12 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

On its first long-player since 2009’s Crash, Decyfer Down confirms its shift away from post-grunge sounds toward a cleaner, more melodic approach that recalls the muscular radio-friendly rock of Bad Company and Foreigner. Singer/bassist T.J. Harris brings classic rock swagger to his role as frontman of this sturdy North Carolina quartet. As before, Decyfer Down grounds the lyrics on Scarecrow in its unshakable Christian faith. Roiling rhythms and crowd-rousing choruses give “Memory” and “Fight to Win” the feel of instant arena anthems. The band stretches out to deliver an angst-filled waltz (“Bleeding Lies”), dips its toes into Southern-style swamp rock (“The River”), and turns down the volume for a straight-ahead praise ballad (“So in Love”). The most risk-taking moment here is “Westboro”: an angry takedown of church-sanctioned bigotry driven home by the searing guitar work of Brandon Mills and Chris Clonts. Harris snarls, struts, and beseeches his way through these tracks, reaching out to the Spirit as he faces down demons without and within, rocking righteously all the while.

EDITORS’ NOTES

On its first long-player since 2009’s Crash, Decyfer Down confirms its shift away from post-grunge sounds toward a cleaner, more melodic approach that recalls the muscular radio-friendly rock of Bad Company and Foreigner. Singer/bassist T.J. Harris brings classic rock swagger to his role as frontman of this sturdy North Carolina quartet. As before, Decyfer Down grounds the lyrics on Scarecrow in its unshakable Christian faith. Roiling rhythms and crowd-rousing choruses give “Memory” and “Fight to Win” the feel of instant arena anthems. The band stretches out to deliver an angst-filled waltz (“Bleeding Lies”), dips its toes into Southern-style swamp rock (“The River”), and turns down the volume for a straight-ahead praise ballad (“So in Love”). The most risk-taking moment here is “Westboro”: an angry takedown of church-sanctioned bigotry driven home by the searing guitar work of Brandon Mills and Chris Clonts. Harris snarls, struts, and beseeches his way through these tracks, reaching out to the Spirit as he faces down demons without and within, rocking righteously all the while.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.1 out of 5
160 Ratings
160 Ratings
photoman320 ,

Not for soccer moms, or the sheltered in general

Absolutely phenomenal satire in these lyrics. Westboro is the perfect way to describe exactly what's wrong those hateful people in Topeka, KS. If you care about the cookie-cutter boring mold of Christian radio, then this isn't for you. On the other hand, if honest, real, authentic lyrics about how the world REALLY operates, from a Christian perspective, then you will like this record. Well done DD. If you think these lyrics are far too strong for any Christian to utter, then you've missed the point. Enjoy your latest Passion CD instead.

Hollow Voice ,

It's a solid album

I don't know what everyone's complaining about. The sound is different sure, but as a band progresses it does have to change a little. Nobody wants to listen to songs that sound the same album after album. I like the effort they put forth.

Golfermandude ,

DD's days are done...

Ever since Caleb left the band, DD has become one of the most boring, generic rock bands in the industry. A key part of a bands success is band/fan communication. DD has absolutely failed in this aspect. Ever since the release of Crash, there have been more Facebook posts about TJ's solo career then the band itself (on the Decyfer Down Facebook page!) And finally, I respect bands who release their albums the same year they announce them, not 5 years later...

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