9 Songs, 29 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Deicide’s 2004 album Scars of the Crucifix was their first release after parting ways with Roadrunner Records and the last to feature founding guitarists Eric and Brian Hoffman. By this point, the internal strife that would soon break this lineup was leaking into the music. Where Deicide had always been an outwardly destructive force, seeking to leave anything that crossed their path in a pile of rubble, those destructive impulses started to turn inward near the end of the Hoffman era. In these songs, Glen Benton’s vocals become an act of self-incineration, while the rhythms often feel jumpy and constrictive, as if the band were asphyxiating themselves. Fortunately, some of these themes actually work in favor of the music, especially because Deicide have always embraced themes of anger, hatred, and annihilation. Tense and frenzied, the music in “Enchanted Nightmare” and “Go Now Your Lord Is Dead” mirrors the images in the lyrics. Overall, the album’s strongest songs arrive toward the beginning. “Scars of the Crucifix” is epically infuriated, while “F**k Your God” lives up to its reputation as a favorite song to play during enemy interrogations.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Deicide’s 2004 album Scars of the Crucifix was their first release after parting ways with Roadrunner Records and the last to feature founding guitarists Eric and Brian Hoffman. By this point, the internal strife that would soon break this lineup was leaking into the music. Where Deicide had always been an outwardly destructive force, seeking to leave anything that crossed their path in a pile of rubble, those destructive impulses started to turn inward near the end of the Hoffman era. In these songs, Glen Benton’s vocals become an act of self-incineration, while the rhythms often feel jumpy and constrictive, as if the band were asphyxiating themselves. Fortunately, some of these themes actually work in favor of the music, especially because Deicide have always embraced themes of anger, hatred, and annihilation. Tense and frenzied, the music in “Enchanted Nightmare” and “Go Now Your Lord Is Dead” mirrors the images in the lyrics. Overall, the album’s strongest songs arrive toward the beginning. “Scars of the Crucifix” is epically infuriated, while “F**k Your God” lives up to its reputation as a favorite song to play during enemy interrogations.

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3:04
2:58
3:31
4:08
2:11
2:58
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5:35

About Deicide

Controversy has plagued Florida-based quartet Deicide. During their first tour in 1992, the band was severely criticized for their statements in favor of animal sacrifices. Their Stockholm, Sweden, concert was canceled after four songs when a bomb was discovered on-stage. Led by vocalist/bass player Glen Benton, Deicide has delivered some of the goriest sounds to ever emanate from the Sunshine State. Their songs continue to radiate with the brutal attack of satanic death metal.

Formed in 1987, Deicide quickly released two demos -- Feasting the Beast in 1987 and Sacrificial in 1989 -- under the name Amon. Signing with Roadrunner Records, they changed their name and released their first full-length CD, featuring all six demo tracks, in 1990. They didn't tour until releasing their second album, Legion, in 1992. A string of albums followed, including Amon: Feasting the Beast (1993), Once Upon the Cross (1995), Serpents of the Light (1997), the live When Satan Lives (1998), Insineratehymn (2000), In Torment, In Hell (2001), Scars of the Crucifix (2004), and Stench of Redemption (2006). Deicide's Till Death Do Us Part was released on Earache Records in April 2008. ~ Craig Harris

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