9 Songs, 52 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Before he had the opportunity to record his debut album, Seal toured Japan in a funk band and sang in a blues group in Thailand. Then with the release of Adamski’s huge single “Killer,” which he sang on, Seal became one of the most recognizable voices out of the U.K. rave scene. All of those diverse factors—R&B roots, internationalism, and techno futurism—came together on Seal’s 1991 debut. For a 27-year-old, he had an incredibly mature voice, full of poignancy, wisdom, and sensuality. While his vocals fit perfectly over the transcendental house-music beats (“Killer” is included here, along with the brilliant club track “The Beginning”), Seal was much more than just another disembodied disco chanter. Producer Trevor Horn immediately tapped into the up-and-coming singer’s roots and encouraged him to spread out on folk and blues-tinged tracks like “Deep Water” and “Killer.” With songs like “Wild,” “Violet," and “Future Love Paradise,” Horn and Seal saw how techno would soon fuse with pop to make the chart music of the future. This formula finds its pinnacle on “Crazy,” a breakout single that set the insistent throb of electronic music to the sleek momentum of jazz.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Before he had the opportunity to record his debut album, Seal toured Japan in a funk band and sang in a blues group in Thailand. Then with the release of Adamski’s huge single “Killer,” which he sang on, Seal became one of the most recognizable voices out of the U.K. rave scene. All of those diverse factors—R&B roots, internationalism, and techno futurism—came together on Seal’s 1991 debut. For a 27-year-old, he had an incredibly mature voice, full of poignancy, wisdom, and sensuality. While his vocals fit perfectly over the transcendental house-music beats (“Killer” is included here, along with the brilliant club track “The Beginning”), Seal was much more than just another disembodied disco chanter. Producer Trevor Horn immediately tapped into the up-and-coming singer’s roots and encouraged him to spread out on folk and blues-tinged tracks like “Deep Water” and “Killer.” With songs like “Wild,” “Violet," and “Future Love Paradise,” Horn and Seal saw how techno would soon fuse with pop to make the chart music of the future. This formula finds its pinnacle on “Crazy,” a breakout single that set the insistent throb of electronic music to the sleek momentum of jazz.

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