"Sempiternal" by Bring Me the Horizon on iTunes

11 Songs

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bring Me the Horizon’s fourth studio album is also its first for RCA. With a switch to a major label, it should come as no surprise that the English metalcore band also ramped up the production of Sempiternal. The electronic flourishes lurking in the periphery of BMTH’s past albums are now at the forefront of its songs. Equally bolstered by sternum-rattling beats and frontman Oliver Sykes’ emotionally urgent howls, the opening anthem “Can You Feel My Heart” may be the most danceable metalcore song to date. However, devotees and purists of the genre will be glad to know that the electro garnishing never overshadows the core elements. “Sleepwalking” is a fine example—the guitars still build towering walls of sonic distortion, and Sykes still sounds like he’s shredding his larynx. The imported electronic textures only add another dimension to a tried-and-true sound. This extends into “Shadow Moses,” where more prevalent beats and neon tones serve as sandwiched layers of depth, letting the propulsive rhythms and muscled riffs stand out alongside Sykes’ screams.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bring Me the Horizon’s fourth studio album is also its first for RCA. With a switch to a major label, it should come as no surprise that the English metalcore band also ramped up the production of Sempiternal. The electronic flourishes lurking in the periphery of BMTH’s past albums are now at the forefront of its songs. Equally bolstered by sternum-rattling beats and frontman Oliver Sykes’ emotionally urgent howls, the opening anthem “Can You Feel My Heart” may be the most danceable metalcore song to date. However, devotees and purists of the genre will be glad to know that the electro garnishing never overshadows the core elements. “Sleepwalking” is a fine example—the guitars still build towering walls of sonic distortion, and Sykes still sounds like he’s shredding his larynx. The imported electronic textures only add another dimension to a tried-and-true sound. This extends into “Shadow Moses,” where more prevalent beats and neon tones serve as sandwiched layers of depth, letting the propulsive rhythms and muscled riffs stand out alongside Sykes’ screams.

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5

458 Ratings

Yeah

Sithkendra,

Cleaner vocals and screams. Going to be the best album compared to others. Already pre ordered. Stoked.

BEST ALBUM YET!!!

Rockinoutloud,

THIS IS THE BEST ALBUM YET!!!!Check out SnakesSing Sleepwalking Empire and ShadowMoses my faves!!(:

About Bring Me the Horizon

Fronted by a tattooed clothing designer and influenced by death metal, grindcore, and emo, Bring Me the Horizon aren't the average deathcore band. The group was formed in 2004 from the ashes of several Sheffield-based outfits, with the 2003 Disney film Pirates of the Caribbean serving as the inspiration for the band's name. Singer Oliver Sykes, guitarists Lee Malia and Curtis Ward, bassist Matt Kean, and drummer Matt Nicholls initially established their own label, Thirty Days of Night, to release their debut EP, 2005's This Is What the Edge of Your Seat Was Made For. Upon signing to the higher-profile label Visible Noise (whose roster also included Bullet for My Valentine and Lostprophets), they reissued the EP to a wider audience. Bring Me the Horizon's full-length debut, Count Your Blessings, appeared in October 2006, with an American release following one year later courtesy of Epitaph Records.

With their second album, Suicide Season, Bring Me the Horizon moved in a more accessible direction and wound up cracking the U.K. album charts. Not everyone approved of the new sound, though, and Ward left the band in early 2009. His temporary replacement was Jona Weinhofen, formerly a member of I Killed the Prom Queen. Weinhofen ended up staying with the band as a permanent member, and the group returned to the studio with producer Fredrik Nordström in March 2010 to begin work on a third album. The resulting There Is a Hell, Believe Me I've Seen It, There Is a Heaven, Let's Keep It a Secret was released during the latter half of 2010, several months after the band wrapped up its engagement with the Warped Tour. A fourth album, the critically lauded Sempiternal, arrived on Epitaph in 2013, and peaked at number three on the U.K. albums chart. 2015's loosely conceptual That's the Spirit saw the group dropping some of their metalcore tendencies in lieu of a more melodic, alt-metal approach. ~ Stewart Mason

  • ORIGIN
    Sheffield, Yorkshire, England
  • FORMED
    2004

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