10 Songs, 39 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

On its self-titled sophomore album, Elephant Stone matches ‘60s rock guitar jangle with elements of classical Indian music to create a distinctive hybrid that’s both accessible and exotic. This time out, frontman Rishi Dhir fully integrates his band’s Eastern and Western influences, giving more exposure to his deft sitar playing. There’s a pronounced psychedelic tint to many of these tracks, along with a commitment to pop songcraft that emphasizes chorus hooks as well as sandalwood-scented ambiance. A touch of Hindu mysticism lends depth to the inviting glide of “Setting Sun,” while “A Silent Moment” fuses a meditative air with droning vocals and a simmering tabla beat. The band approaches its music with a feel for tight, cogent arrangements, whether it's going for a crisp, Byrdsy sound (“Love the Sinner, Hate the Sin”) or a trippy, feedback-washed feel (“Sally Go Round the Sun”). The floodgates are opened for “The Sea of Your Mind”: a nearly nine-minute excursion into lysergic folk-rock that shows off Dhir’s instrumental prowess. All told, Elephant Stone’s Hindi Rock vision comes closer to full-blown reality on this spacy yet solidly constructed effort.

EDITORS’ NOTES

On its self-titled sophomore album, Elephant Stone matches ‘60s rock guitar jangle with elements of classical Indian music to create a distinctive hybrid that’s both accessible and exotic. This time out, frontman Rishi Dhir fully integrates his band’s Eastern and Western influences, giving more exposure to his deft sitar playing. There’s a pronounced psychedelic tint to many of these tracks, along with a commitment to pop songcraft that emphasizes chorus hooks as well as sandalwood-scented ambiance. A touch of Hindu mysticism lends depth to the inviting glide of “Setting Sun,” while “A Silent Moment” fuses a meditative air with droning vocals and a simmering tabla beat. The band approaches its music with a feel for tight, cogent arrangements, whether it's going for a crisp, Byrdsy sound (“Love the Sinner, Hate the Sin”) or a trippy, feedback-washed feel (“Sally Go Round the Sun”). The floodgates are opened for “The Sea of Your Mind”: a nearly nine-minute excursion into lysergic folk-rock that shows off Dhir’s instrumental prowess. All told, Elephant Stone’s Hindi Rock vision comes closer to full-blown reality on this spacy yet solidly constructed effort.

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