10 Songs, 35 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bob Dylan’s decision to record an album of standards, all recorded previously by Frank Sinatra at some point, excited faithful fans who heard the advance tracks “Full Moon and Empty Arms” and “Stay With Me.” All 10 songs were cut live in Capitol Records’ legendary Studio B, with Dylan’s five-piece band and a small orchestra working together without piano to create an aura of late-night mystery. On “I’m a Fool to Want You,” Dylan’s voice conveys the weariness that none other than Billie Holiday tackled late in her career, and he brings hard-won nuance to classic songs as wise as “What’ll I Do.”

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bob Dylan’s decision to record an album of standards, all recorded previously by Frank Sinatra at some point, excited faithful fans who heard the advance tracks “Full Moon and Empty Arms” and “Stay With Me.” All 10 songs were cut live in Capitol Records’ legendary Studio B, with Dylan’s five-piece band and a small orchestra working together without piano to create an aura of late-night mystery. On “I’m a Fool to Want You,” Dylan’s voice conveys the weariness that none other than Billie Holiday tackled late in her career, and he brings hard-won nuance to classic songs as wise as “What’ll I Do.”

Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

3.5 out of 5
283 Ratings
283 Ratings
Deejai09 ,

DeeJai09

So here’s the thing. I once sat in a Jazz club in New York taking in some brilliant players, old players, top of their game players, got nothing to lose players, when they invite this guy up from the audience to sing a couple of songs. This guy was old too, some might say too old, should have hung it up a long time ago but singing is what he did for his life, it’s what he knew, band stands in night clubs with stages so cramped the band had to turn sideways to play. Those who knew him shut up because they respected that and they knew that once he started to sing the ones who wouldn’t shut up soon would. Why? Because this old man played the piano and sang like that was the last song he was ever gonna get to sing and he needed us to hear it. If he died right there on that stage on 54th Street, he was okay with that because even though he may have hit an off note or two he was singing from a place most of us cannot even imagine. His life, his spent or misspent youth, his successes and his failures, the girls, the booze, the road but mostly he sang out of love for the music because that was his life, that was his story. Like that amazing man in that crowded bar who, in fact, brought the house down with his lively “old man” song, Bob has earned that right. His story matters. Don’t go away Bob. Some of us still listen and there is much at stake.

Awflrowing ,

Totally organic

I have loved the "parlor" type music that he has been making over the past few albums ("Time and Love", "Modern Times") and especially "Duquesne Whistle" from "Tempest." This seems perfectly in keeping with the trajectory of his career and musical interests. He has always loved the music of "weird old America." It's not like he's using a big band and trying to do a Nelson Riddle/Linda Ronstadt type of standards mix. This feels more like what Willie Nelson did with "Stardust" and "Over the Rainbow." Willie Nelson and Bob Dylan are basically the only major American artists whose careers have a direct line back to Louis Armstrong and Jimmie Rogers and Bing Crosby -- in other words, the fountain where American popular music began. I say, bravo.

henryporter ,

I’LL STICK WITH MR. DYLAN

I’d listen to Bob and his band sing and play a phone book before i would listen to 90% of the crap coming out in music today.

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