12 Songs, 36 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The GRAMMY®-nominated pianist and pop star can add another line to her C/V: musical composer and lyricist. After creating the songs for the stage production of Waitress, she decided to record her own version. What’s Inside: Songs from Waitress has all the hallmarks of what makes Bareilles great: the sharp wit, the intimate balladry, the fierce tenacity. Upbeat moments like “Door Number Three” and “Bad Idea” highlights Sara’s swinging, lilting style that leaves you tapping a toe and singing in the aisles.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The GRAMMY®-nominated pianist and pop star can add another line to her C/V: musical composer and lyricist. After creating the songs for the stage production of Waitress, she decided to record her own version. What’s Inside: Songs from Waitress has all the hallmarks of what makes Bareilles great: the sharp wit, the intimate balladry, the fierce tenacity. Upbeat moments like “Door Number Three” and “Bad Idea” highlights Sara’s swinging, lilting style that leaves you tapping a toe and singing in the aisles.

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5

330 Ratings

A Little Off The Path, And A Whole Lotta Love

papa-cass,

What’s Inside: Songs From Waitress is a piece of a larger story. A story that began two years ago and is still ongoing. This is not a traditional record for Bareilles, it is very much a concept record, and as such might disappoint for someone looking for the next “Brave” or “Love Song.” But what it does offer, is a heavy dose of personality, warmth, insecurity, love, loneliness, and hope.

For anyone worried that Sara couldn’t pull off writing a Broadway Musical, set your fears aside. She’s done it, and incredibly so. There’s moments of Sondheim, moments of deep character study and in-the-moment frantic examination (When He Sees Me). There’s the stylized and fuzzy feeling of Schwartz, where you just smile ear to ear for minutes on end (Never Ever Getting Rid Of Me). And there’s devastatingly somber notes reminiscent of Jason Robert Brown, that tug at your heart-strings and won’t go away (You Matter To Me). But make no mistake, this music is whole-heartedly Bareilles. She doesn’t try to be someone else, molding herself after their style. Sara is absolutely a composer and lyricist for the medium of musical theatre.

However, this album allows her to mold her material back into the realm of her piano-pop persona, and it fits comfortably so. Her upbeat catchy tunes (Door Number Three) and ovation-worthy ballads (She Used To Be Mine) are as good as they’ve ever been, and the production from Neal Avron (who produced Bareilles’ “Kaleidoscope Heart” album) puts these songs comfortable in the frame of her previous repertoire.

In the end, take from it what is being put out, a brilliant piece of a larger story. It’s too early to see if any of the songs from What’s Inside will have mainstream legs like those from her previous albums, but if She Used To Be Mine doesn’t become a highly-requested radio hit, there’s something very wrong. Parts of me wishes there was just more - what we have is essentially a ten-song album - but that comes from the material that is there being so incredibly good. I’m on my fourth play through already, and there’s no slowing down. Flour, sugar, butter, and Bareilles makes for a delectable and tasty treat for months to come.

好听死噜。

胡萝卜水笔,

简直太好听惹,喜翻儿惹噜。

About Sara Bareilles

A gifted songwriter and a versatile pianist with no formal training, Sara Bareilles burst onto the pop scene with a naturally skilled voice that ranged from powerful and soulful to sweet and gentle, earning her instant comparisons to Fiona Apple and Norah Jones. At age 18, she left the Redwood forests of her hometown, Eureka, California, in pursuit of a music career in Los Angeles. Although she attended UCLA's Communication Studies program, Bareilles spent the majority of her spare time studying her new environment and writing poetry and songs about the busy surroundings.

After graduation, she spent the next three years performing her songs at open-mike nights, slowly building her confidence as a musician before graduating to local clubs and festivals. In 2003, she co-produced her first demo, Careful Confessions, and became enthralled with recording techniques. Eager to go back to the studio and create a second full-length album, she started shopping her CD around and signed a deal with Epic Records in April 2005. Producer Eric Rosse took her under his wing the following February and the two spent a little over a year perfecting the orchestration -- nearly half of the songs had formerly appeared on Careful Confessions, and a new batch of tracks was carefully constructed in order to make her first major-label release as strong as possible. The lyrical themes of the album, entitled Little Voice and released in July 2007, covered her past relationships, insecurities, and inner battles with trying to trust her instincts. The single "Love Song" made the album a hit; both single and album reached the Top Ten, with "Love Song" eventually selling more than three million copies.

With a hit album on her hands, Bareilles hit the road and toured heavily for the next two years, releasing a concert album (Between the Lines: Sara Bareilles Live at the Fillmore) along the way. Playing her songs night after night inspired her to begin writing new material, and Bareilles found herself drawn to material that was bigger, bolder, and peppier than the songs that comprised Little Voice. The result was Kaleidoscope Heart, which marked her second major-label effort upon its release in mid-2010. Kaleidoscope Heart debuted at number one on the Billboard charts, beginning a pretty hectic year for Bareilles. She toured the album well into 2011 and in the fall of that year, she signed on to NBC's televised competition The Sing-Off as a judge.

After The Sing-Off wrapped up its run in the spring of 2012, Bareilles recorded the Once Upon Another Time EP with her fellow judge Ben Folds acting as producer. She toured semi-regularly throughout 2012 as she prepped a new album. That full-length record, her fourth, was called The Blessed Unrest and was released in July 2013.

Partially on the strength of the single "Brave," The Blessed Unrest debuted at two on the Billboard Top 200 upon its release and in the next year it received a Grammy nomination for Album of the Year; "Brave" also received a nomination for Best Pop Solo Performance. Following the album cycle for The Blessed Unrest, Bareilles turned her attention toward completing a memoir and writing the music for Diana Paulus' adaptation of Adrienne Shelly's 2007 film Waitress. Both projects surfaced in the autumn of 2015. The book, entitled Sounds Like Me, appeared in October while What's Inside: Songs from Waitress saw release in November. ~ Jason Lymangrover

  • ORIGIN
    Eureka, CA
  • GENRE
    Pop
  • BORN
    December 7, 1979

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