12 Songs, 49 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Unofficially known as "The Butterfly Album" (due to its cover) or "Fontana" (due to the label that originally released it), this second self-titled album from Britain's House of Love perfectly captures the alternative-pop world in 1990. (The band actually had a third self-titled set, a collection of early singles now titled The German Album.) Here, a sense of The Smiths' melodicism is matched with an atmospheric production that hints at the emerging Madchester scene, with songs that are as exciting and emotionally palpable as the first self-titled album. A re-recording of the band's single "Shine On" kicks with stronger urgency. "I Don't Know Why I Love You" spins like a sparkling hit single that would've been the band's arena anthem in the U.S. had its commercial fortunes matched its artistic achievements. "Never" starts with congas reminiscent of "Sympathy for the Devil" before chugging on like a song Lloyd Cole dreamed up one night. Leader Guy Chadwick outdoes himself on the forlorn "Someone's Got to Love You," where the acoustic guitar bounces off the night sky before mild psychedelic electric guitars fill out the rest of the sound. "Blind" casts a similarly bittersweet aura.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Unofficially known as "The Butterfly Album" (due to its cover) or "Fontana" (due to the label that originally released it), this second self-titled album from Britain's House of Love perfectly captures the alternative-pop world in 1990. (The band actually had a third self-titled set, a collection of early singles now titled The German Album.) Here, a sense of The Smiths' melodicism is matched with an atmospheric production that hints at the emerging Madchester scene, with songs that are as exciting and emotionally palpable as the first self-titled album. A re-recording of the band's single "Shine On" kicks with stronger urgency. "I Don't Know Why I Love You" spins like a sparkling hit single that would've been the band's arena anthem in the U.S. had its commercial fortunes matched its artistic achievements. "Never" starts with congas reminiscent of "Sympathy for the Devil" before chugging on like a song Lloyd Cole dreamed up one night. Leader Guy Chadwick outdoes himself on the forlorn "Someone's Got to Love You," where the acoustic guitar bounces off the night sky before mild psychedelic electric guitars fill out the rest of the sound. "Blind" casts a similarly bittersweet aura.

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Ratings and Reviews

5.0 out of 5
16 Ratings
16 Ratings
Matt Inc74 ,

Solid

This is a crazy good album from a great '80s shoegazer pop rock group, and I can't believe there is not an official review and that I am the only one who's reviewed it so far... "Beatles and Stones" (one of the best songs ever written), "I Don't Know Why I Love You," "Hannah," and "Shine On" are the stand-outs, but this is solid from front to back.

Clovis Jenkins ,

DEFINITELY solid!

I have to agree with Matt Inc74...this album is just to good to NOT have an official review...or MORE reviews, for that matter. It's one of the best albums from the 80s "start-to-finish" and you'll be hard-pressed to find a pop album that delivers such layered melodies as this gem. Truly underrated, overlooked, and underplayed. Although I love the favorites on the album, I'll have to say that songs like "Hedonist", "Se Dest" and "Never" really kept me interested. Cheers!

Global Shakedown ,

One of the best records of its era

Nirvana's emergence as well as the breakup of The Smiths conspired to deny American audiences widescale exposure to the great blend of sound, songwriting and pop sensibility that this record represents. There is not a bad song on this record and a lot of catchy, great ones. Jangly guitars vocal harmonies, melodies and ethereal, layered soundscapes, and quality songwriting make this like diving into a novel or tv show that you can read or watch over and over again. "Beatles and Stones", "I don't know why I love You" and everything else on this record are timeless.

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