Show Time by Slave on Apple Music

8 Songs

EDITORS’ NOTES

Slave’s excellent 1980 album Stone Jam is one of a handful of LPs that bridged ‘70s funk to ‘80s funk, and by the release of the following year’s Show Time the venerable Ohio-based ensemble had firmly taken hold of the new decade. The grooves are tighter and more sophisticated than ever before, but Show Time, true to its title, is a full-bodied and outgoing affair. Mark Antone Adams’ fat, loose-limbed bass leads every song. “Snap Shot,” “Party Lites,” and “Wait for Me” are bolstered by waves of horns, strings, and percussion, but Adams’ gritty, gutsy playing is the foundation upon which the songs are built. Show Time was drummer-turned-singer Steve Arrington's last album with Slave before going solo, and he makes the most of it. “Steal Your Heart” layers several different tracks of Arrington parts, enabling his keening, cooing voice to duet with itself. As always, he gives the songs an air of sensual intrigue. In the early ‘80s his effeminate, introverted vocals were an R&B anomaly, but he would become a major influence on urban pop singers in the decade to follow.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Slave’s excellent 1980 album Stone Jam is one of a handful of LPs that bridged ‘70s funk to ‘80s funk, and by the release of the following year’s Show Time the venerable Ohio-based ensemble had firmly taken hold of the new decade. The grooves are tighter and more sophisticated than ever before, but Show Time, true to its title, is a full-bodied and outgoing affair. Mark Antone Adams’ fat, loose-limbed bass leads every song. “Snap Shot,” “Party Lites,” and “Wait for Me” are bolstered by waves of horns, strings, and percussion, but Adams’ gritty, gutsy playing is the foundation upon which the songs are built. Show Time was drummer-turned-singer Steve Arrington's last album with Slave before going solo, and he makes the most of it. “Steal Your Heart” layers several different tracks of Arrington parts, enabling his keening, cooing voice to duet with itself. As always, he gives the songs an air of sensual intrigue. In the early ‘80s his effeminate, introverted vocals were an R&B anomaly, but he would become a major influence on urban pop singers in the decade to follow.

TITLE TIME
4:42
4:54
4:57
5:25
5:17
5:24
5:07
3:46

About Slave

Arguably the hottest of the '70s Ohio funk bands, Slave had a great run in the late '70s and early '80s. Trumpeter Steve Washington formed the group in Dayton in 1975. Vocalist Floyd Miller teamed with Tom Lockett Jr, Charlie Bradley, Mark Adams, Mark Hicks, Danny Webster, Orion Wilhoite, Curt Jones, and Tim Dozier. Vocalists Steve Arrington and Starleana Young came aboard in 1978, with Arrington ultimately becoming lead vocalist. Their first big hit was the thumping single "Slide" in 1977 for Cotillion; they remained with that label until 1984. Their best tracks were lyrically simple and at times silly, but the arrangements and rhythms were intense and hypnotic. Other Top Ten R&B hits were "Just a Touch of Love" in 1979, "Watching You" in 1980, and "Snap Shot" in 1981. Young, Washington, and Lockett departed to form Aurra in 1979. Arrington himself left in the early '80s. They added Charles Carter, Delburt Taylor, Sam Carter, Kevin Johnson, and Roger Parker as replacements and continued on, though much less successfully, into the late '80s. They moved to Atlantic for one LP in 1984, then switched to the Atlanta-based Ichiban in 1986 for singles and LPs that were just a shade of the former vibrant Slave sound. Their most recent release was The Funk Strikes Back in 1992. Rhino issued Stellar Funk: The Best of Slave, a first-rate anthology of their finest cuts, in 1994. ~ Ron Wynn

  • ORIGIN
    Dayton, OH
  • FORMED
    1975

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