11 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

A.C. Newman's third solo LP reaches back to bygone pop classics for its soft tones and lush, inviting textures. Newman evokes artists like Bread and Gerry Rafferty (whose track "Baker Street" Newman cites as an "obsession" during recording) as much as The Shins and Belle & Sebastian, with Newman subjecting pillowy choruses and sweet melodies to the warm, spacious production he uses on his solo records. Inspired by life-changing events like birth (his son) and death (his mother), Newman has written poignant songs without holding much back. The warm burbles of organ and gentle cascades of acoustic guitar and clarinet notes make fine foundations for his emotional expressions. On the bubbly and winsome "I'm Not Talking" and the ghostly waltz "You Could Get Lost Out Here," one can feel the uncertainty that likely beleaguers all new parents: a mixture of joy and fear accompanied by the startling knowledge that everything has changed forever. The title track is a moving, lilting piece about grief. One of Newman's many gifts is letting the listener in on his secrets while giving us the space to live with our own.

EDITORS’ NOTES

A.C. Newman's third solo LP reaches back to bygone pop classics for its soft tones and lush, inviting textures. Newman evokes artists like Bread and Gerry Rafferty (whose track "Baker Street" Newman cites as an "obsession" during recording) as much as The Shins and Belle & Sebastian, with Newman subjecting pillowy choruses and sweet melodies to the warm, spacious production he uses on his solo records. Inspired by life-changing events like birth (his son) and death (his mother), Newman has written poignant songs without holding much back. The warm burbles of organ and gentle cascades of acoustic guitar and clarinet notes make fine foundations for his emotional expressions. On the bubbly and winsome "I'm Not Talking" and the ghostly waltz "You Could Get Lost Out Here," one can feel the uncertainty that likely beleaguers all new parents: a mixture of joy and fear accompanied by the startling knowledge that everything has changed forever. The title track is a moving, lilting piece about grief. One of Newman's many gifts is letting the listener in on his secrets while giving us the space to live with our own.

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
34 Ratings
34 Ratings
ccrider ,

EXCELLENT RETURN!

I've been a fan of AC since his first album and have seen him on numerous occasions but I have to admit I was a bit disappointed with his second album.
This is a true return of force and I believe this might be his best yet.

"You could get lost out here" is probably my favorite tune but really all are really well done and the album flows well.
Great from start to finish!

loonranger ,

With a bow to --

Nick Lowe. (Not a bad thing, by the way.)

SYNTH SQUELCH ,

The good and bad of this album...

The good: most of the time the 'music/rhythm portion is ok.

The bad: most of the songs, the lyrics are corny.

What a shame, because I really like A.C. Newman's voice. I would loved to have added him to some of my playlists.

About A.C. Newman

Vancouver-based guitarist and singer/songwriter Allan Carl Newman broke into the Canadian music scene in the early '90s as a member of alternative rock/grunge outfit Superconductor. A longer stint with power pop group Zumpano followed in the mid-'90s, resulting in two well-received albums, Look What the Rookie Did and Goin' Through Changes, but it wasn't until Newman formed the New Pornographers in 2000 that his hook-filled guitar pop anthems became staples of the crowded 21st century indie rock scene. The Newman-led collective released a string of popular records over the next decade. Peppered in between were numerous solo projects from bandmembers Neko Case, Dan Bejar (Destroyer), and Newman himself, who released his solo debut, Slow Wonder, in 2004 and Get Guilty in 2009, both of which arrived via Matador Records. In 2012, Newman delivered Shut Down the Streets, which showcased a layered, often acoustic, baroque and folk-pop sound. The following year Newman provided the score for the Daniel Radcliffe and Zoe Kazan-starring romantic comedy What If. ~ James Christopher Monger

HOMETOWN
Vancouver, British Columbia, Cana
BORN
April 14, 1968

Songs

Albums

Listeners Also Bought