11 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With or without his partner Big Kenny, John Rich likes to stir up controversy when the mood strikes him. On his solo debut Son of a Preacher Man, the ex-Lonestar vocalist matches some pointed political commentary with assorted observations on life, love and family. Tapping into a vein of populist anger, he assails greedy corporate execs in “Shuttin’ Detroit Down,” and then celebrates heartland values in “The Good Lord and the Man” (a toast to World War II heroes), “Trucker Man” (an anthem for today’s long-haulers), and “Preacher Man” (an affirmation of that Old Time Religion and the father who embodied it). Balancing these message-laden numbers are stirring romantic ballads like “Another You” and “I Thought You’d Never Ask.” There are some welcome flashes of Rich’s outrageous side as well, found in the swaggering “Everybody Wants to Be Me” and the boozy, Big Band-flavored “Drive Myself to Drink.” The music here is up to Big & Rich’s usual standard of sharp, smoothly executed country-rock.

EDITORS’ NOTES

With or without his partner Big Kenny, John Rich likes to stir up controversy when the mood strikes him. On his solo debut Son of a Preacher Man, the ex-Lonestar vocalist matches some pointed political commentary with assorted observations on life, love and family. Tapping into a vein of populist anger, he assails greedy corporate execs in “Shuttin’ Detroit Down,” and then celebrates heartland values in “The Good Lord and the Man” (a toast to World War II heroes), “Trucker Man” (an anthem for today’s long-haulers), and “Preacher Man” (an affirmation of that Old Time Religion and the father who embodied it). Balancing these message-laden numbers are stirring romantic ballads like “Another You” and “I Thought You’d Never Ask.” There are some welcome flashes of Rich’s outrageous side as well, found in the swaggering “Everybody Wants to Be Me” and the boozy, Big Band-flavored “Drive Myself to Drink.” The music here is up to Big & Rich’s usual standard of sharp, smoothly executed country-rock.

TITLE TIME
4:01
3:09
3:39
3:51
3:34
3:40
3:26
3:19
5:31
3:27
3:28

About John Rich

Born in Amarillo, TX, singer/songwriter John Rich had his first taste of success in Nashville as the lead singer for Lonestar. He left the band amid some turmoil after the release of its second album, and headed into the studio to make a record of his own. The resulting Underneath the Same Moon -- which featured collaborations with Sara Evans, the Fairfield Four, and Delbert McClinton, as well as his future songwriting partner from Big & Rich, Kenny Alphin (aka Big Kenny) -- was finished and unfortunately shelved in 1998. Meanwhile, Big Kenny had recorded his own solo album, Live a Little, only to see it suffer the same fate as Underneath the Same Moon. With no solo album to support, the two songwriters funneled their energies into Big & Rich, which became a popular country duo during the 2000s. Years later, Rich's success with Alphin renewed interest in his solo album, prompting BNA Records to officially release Underneath the Same Moon in March of 2006. Rich spent the following year hosting his own reality TV show, Gone Country, and touring in support of Big & Rich's third studio album. Meanwhile, he found time to further his solo career with the the reserved Son of a Preacher Man, which marked his second solo record upon its release in early 2009. After getting that album out of his system, Rich released the single “Country Done Come to Town" as a precursor to the harder-edged, party-down sound of of his 2010 full-length, Rich Rocks, which more fully recalls the early days of Big & Rich. ~ James Christopher Monger

  • ORIGIN
    Amarillo, TX
  • BORN
    January 7, 1974

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