11 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

From the retro-futuristic cover art by Stranger Things poster designer Kyle Lambert to lyrical themes of oppression, the English band’s eighth album, Simulation Theory, plays like an ’80s sci-fi flick. The opening set of songs lays out a bleak setting: “Algorithim” and “The Dark Side” are cries for help set against caterwauling synth-rock. Yet rather than wallow in despair, the band uses stirring oratory and a spectacular wall-of-sound to rise against systematic, technological, and mental anguish. They rally the troops on “Thought Contagion,” “Dig Down,” and “Get Up and Fight,” while “Something Human” shows that even a platinum-selling megaband needs a reassuring hug sometimes. The one Simulation Theory song that will surely inspire debate is “Propaganda,” the trio’s collaboration with producer Timbaland. On it, lead singer Matt Bellamy locks into a sexy falsetto while Timbaland puts his foot (and a slide guitar) into the track. Will longtime Muse fans accept a Timberlake-like pure-pop turn from Bellamy? It’s a tipping point but one that was inevitable; after exploring darkness on Drones, The 2nd Law, and The Resistance, Simulation Theory shows the band embracing fresh styles.

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

From the retro-futuristic cover art by Stranger Things poster designer Kyle Lambert to lyrical themes of oppression, the English band’s eighth album, Simulation Theory, plays like an ’80s sci-fi flick. The opening set of songs lays out a bleak setting: “Algorithim” and “The Dark Side” are cries for help set against caterwauling synth-rock. Yet rather than wallow in despair, the band uses stirring oratory and a spectacular wall-of-sound to rise against systematic, technological, and mental anguish. They rally the troops on “Thought Contagion,” “Dig Down,” and “Get Up and Fight,” while “Something Human” shows that even a platinum-selling megaband needs a reassuring hug sometimes. The one Simulation Theory song that will surely inspire debate is “Propaganda,” the trio’s collaboration with producer Timbaland. On it, lead singer Matt Bellamy locks into a sexy falsetto while Timbaland puts his foot (and a slide guitar) into the track. Will longtime Muse fans accept a Timberlake-like pure-pop turn from Bellamy? It’s a tipping point but one that was inevitable; after exploring darkness on Drones, The 2nd Law, and The Resistance, Simulation Theory shows the band embracing fresh styles.

Mastered for iTunes
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Ratings and Reviews

4.0 out of 5
65 Ratings
65 Ratings
musicmanpat ,

Great buy

Every song on here is excellent aside from dig down and the void. Best songs imo are. Something human, get up and fight, and pressure.

Fahrenheight17 ,

Still Good

It doesn’t bring the Earth-shattering effect as the previous album, but as always good music nonetheless. Still prefer their sound when they go hard on the instruments over tech

M(!)nster ,

How!

This is truly amazing. I never would have guessed that this album idea would work but I better never question Muse for they have mastered music. I mean that, I play music but I honestly could not imagine such diversity and mastering everything they have ever tried. I hope they play Algorithm alternate reality version on tour. Id pay $1000 just to see it live :)

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