19 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Berklee-trained Brazilian composer Marcelo Zarvos cements his reputation as one of the leading composers of indie filmmaking (The Door in the Floor, Hollywoodland, The Wrestler) with this evocative score for writer-director Cary Fukunaga’s Ecuadorian immigrant’s odyssey (which also took Directing and Cinematography awards at Sundance in 2009). Using the story’s rich indigenous music textures as a foundation, Zarvos constructs a spare, yet no less emotionally compelling score where Central American folk modalities and Western neoclassicism swirl into a seamless evocation of place, time and dramatic conflict. The composer helps fuse those disparate traditions with a driving, minimalist sense of rhythm that also becomes musical metaphor for the film’s physical journey, while his judicious, refined use of melodies makes them all the more memorable in a score that turns largely on textural intrigues.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Berklee-trained Brazilian composer Marcelo Zarvos cements his reputation as one of the leading composers of indie filmmaking (The Door in the Floor, Hollywoodland, The Wrestler) with this evocative score for writer-director Cary Fukunaga’s Ecuadorian immigrant’s odyssey (which also took Directing and Cinematography awards at Sundance in 2009). Using the story’s rich indigenous music textures as a foundation, Zarvos constructs a spare, yet no less emotionally compelling score where Central American folk modalities and Western neoclassicism swirl into a seamless evocation of place, time and dramatic conflict. The composer helps fuse those disparate traditions with a driving, minimalist sense of rhythm that also becomes musical metaphor for the film’s physical journey, while his judicious, refined use of melodies makes them all the more memorable in a score that turns largely on textural intrigues.

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About Marcelo Zarvos

A veteran composer with many high-profile film scores to his credit, Brazilian pianist Marcelo Zarvos was born in São Paulo, Brazil. Initially studying classical music in his teens, Zarvos attended Berklee College of Music in Boston and later became active in the jazz world, releasing a highly touted collaboration with saxophonist Peter Epstein called Dualism. His creative endeavors also expanded to include rock, electronic, and world music, a versatility that he would eventually parlay into a highly successful career composing film music. Beginning with the 2001 film Kissing Jessica Stein, Zarvos' profile rose as a go-to composer in Hollywood, Europe, and the New York independent film scene. Some of his many credits include Strangers with Candy (2005), The Good Shepherd (2006), The Air I Breathe (2007), Brooklyn's Finest (2009), and the HBO biopic Phil Spector (2013). He also began working on television, composing the scores for two different Showtime series: The Affair and Ray Donovan. He has twice been nominated for an Emmy Award, for You Don't Know Jack and Taking Chance. ~ Timothy Monger

HOMETOWN
São Paulo, Brazil

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