22 Songs, 53 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

As a member of the Moldy Peaches and as a solo performer, Adam Green mixes the cutesy with the profane, the serious with the silly, and approximates the mood and tone of the many singer-songwriters who have come before him. Much like his contemporaries — Momus, the Magnetic Fields’ Stephin Merritt, Ween — Green treats music like he’s flipping the dial on a very hip karaoke machine where his original tunes have replaced the usual hits. On his fifth solo album, 2008’s Sixes and Sevens, he finds Jonathan Richman innocence (“Tropical Island”), Tom Jones nightclub schmaltz (“Twee Twee Dee”), Lee Hazlewood darkness (“Getting Led”), and Stephen Malkmus quickstep (“Be My Man”) within his circle of competence. At twenty tunes, and only two exceeding the three-minute mark, the ambitious mix plays less like a stylistically cohesive album than an eclectic radio station where the singer just happens to sound the same. Legendary arranger David Campbell (Leonard Cohen, Cat Power) assists with creating the right soundscapes: “Broadcast Beach” bases itself on a ‘60s girl-group schematic; “It’s A Fine” could be a Gordon Lightfoot outtake; “Homelife” comes to life like Scott Walker with its thick orchestration. Quite a variety.

EDITORS’ NOTES

As a member of the Moldy Peaches and as a solo performer, Adam Green mixes the cutesy with the profane, the serious with the silly, and approximates the mood and tone of the many singer-songwriters who have come before him. Much like his contemporaries — Momus, the Magnetic Fields’ Stephin Merritt, Ween — Green treats music like he’s flipping the dial on a very hip karaoke machine where his original tunes have replaced the usual hits. On his fifth solo album, 2008’s Sixes and Sevens, he finds Jonathan Richman innocence (“Tropical Island”), Tom Jones nightclub schmaltz (“Twee Twee Dee”), Lee Hazlewood darkness (“Getting Led”), and Stephen Malkmus quickstep (“Be My Man”) within his circle of competence. At twenty tunes, and only two exceeding the three-minute mark, the ambitious mix plays less like a stylistically cohesive album than an eclectic radio station where the singer just happens to sound the same. Legendary arranger David Campbell (Leonard Cohen, Cat Power) assists with creating the right soundscapes: “Broadcast Beach” bases itself on a ‘60s girl-group schematic; “It’s A Fine” could be a Gordon Lightfoot outtake; “Homelife” comes to life like Scott Walker with its thick orchestration. Quite a variety.

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About Adam Green

Singer/songwriter Adam Green is most known for his stint with the Moldy Peaches, but in the new millennium he also did the solo thing. His music is a sophisticated indie folk mix, showcasing an appealing peculiarity similar to the likes of Leonard Cohen. In September 2002, Green marked his solo debut with the release of Garfield, followed by the next year's Friends of Mine, which contained the single "Jessica," about Jessica Simpson. In 2005 and 2006, Green released a pair of dynamic albums, Gemstones and Jacket Full of Danger, respectively. The following year, the singer found himself with a bit more mainstream attention thanks to his duet with fellow-Moldy Peach Kimya Dawson, "Anyone Else But You," featured in the hit film Juno, and in 2008, his fifth solo full-length, Sixes & Sevens, came out. After the release of his 2010 album Minor Love, which was his most accessible work yet, Green took time off from music to devote his full attention to his art career and filmmaking ventures. When he came back to music in 2012, he paired with singer/songwriter Binki Shapiro to write and record an album's worth of duets in the vein of Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazlewood. The finished album, Adam Green & Binki Shapiro, was released in early 2013 by Rounder Records.

~ MacKenzie Wilson

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