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Slum Village

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iTunes Review

After making inroads to the mainstream with 2002’s Trinity and 2004’s Detroit Deli, Slum Village’s eponymous 2005 album marked a return to its Detroit roots and a reaffirmation of hip-hop basics. Produced entirely by the Detroit collective B.R. Gunna (Black Milk, Young RJ, Fat Ray), the album makes no attempts to include guests outside of Slum’s immediate circle. Dwele, Phat Kat, Que D, and J Isaac are Detroit locals who've been close to the group for years. On the group’s early albums the rhymes were very loose, but as T3 and Elzhi have aged the rapping has grown tougher and more focused. Elzhi uses “Giant” to confront the looming shadow of the band’s legacy: “Let the people be the judge/We know and expect it/You hoeing the record way before the needle even budge/The most hated on, and I stayed alone, was rated wrong/And it’s a headache, like yanking domes with a straightening comb.” Slum Village still has a gentle touch and feel for meditative moods, but “1,2,” “Set It," and “Hear This” are easily the most rugged performances of the group’s career.

Customer Reviews

Hip Hop Returns

While the depth of the lyrical play seems a bit shallow the beats are classic hip hop material reminiscent of A Tribe Called Quest, Pete Rock, and Gangstarr. Not your typical 2005 hip hop radio play but for true followers of the original hip hop movement. Check out the complex mixing of "Can I Be Me". Top Notch!

Willbeezee says "Slum Village" is at it again...

Slum Village...untouched..Neo-Soul music with rap Crescendo....Takes me back to the B-Boy days when rap made sense.....on point all the time...go at it Slum..ya doing it again..and Jay-Dee I need another solo joint from you...post it and I will buy it...Willbeezee OUT!!!

The S & The V

Slum Village comes back with their best record since Fantastic Vol. 2, and that is the TRUTH. While I believe Trinity was way ahead of it's time and Detroit Deli was an excellent tribute to the city that gave birth their sound, Slum Village's latest LP has really showed the growth of SV. SV is considered a liquid association with other members such as Jay Dee AKA J. Dilla, Baatin, Dwele & the Platinum Pied Pipers' Waajeed & many others, T3 & Elzhi represent the group on this album. Elzhi's lyrical skill is undeniable... but it's brought to the forefront on this album. T3 also shows the nay-sayers that his lyrical skills have indeed improved as well. The production duo, B.R. Gunna aka Black Milk & Young RJ, has really impressed me with their improved sound on this album. With cuts like the Black Milk produced banger "Set It", B.R. Gunna's "Call Me" which samples The Isley Bros. "Footsteps In the Dark", the melodic "Multiply", "Hell Naw!" and the Fantastic Vol. 2 inspired "Fantastic" are all stand outs in my book. Overall, this is a complete album... one that you can start at the beginning & not have to skip a single track while listening to it. Don't sleep on Slum Village...

Biography

Formed: 1996 in Detroit, MI

Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap

Years Active: '90s, '00s, '10s

Rising from the rugged streets and rich musical tapestry of Detroit, Slum Village were poised to carry on the old-school, funk, and soul-filled hip-hop torch of genre pioneers A Tribe Called Quest, De La Soul, and the Pharcyde. Growing up in the Conant Garden neighborhood of Detroit and forming during high school at Detroit's Pershing High School, MCs Baatin, Jay Dee, and T3 quickly garnered praise and recognition in the local underground scene. In the mid-'90s, Jay Dee became part of the hip-hop...
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Slum Village, Slum Village
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