12 Songs, 34 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Spoon’s fourth album finds the indie rock stalwarts distilling their strengths—atmospheric effects, spidery guitars, impressionistic lyrics—into a perfectly streamlined package. Frontman Britt Daniel is as enigmatic and evocative as ever, conjuring a tender love affair over the flickering chords of “Paper Tiger” and drawing on rangy, looping piano to channel youthful anomie on “The Way We Get By.” Simultaneously spare and sonically dense, romantic and reserved, percussive and sweetly melodic, Kill the Moonlight is a testament to using minimalism for maximum effect.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Spoon’s fourth album finds the indie rock stalwarts distilling their strengths—atmospheric effects, spidery guitars, impressionistic lyrics—into a perfectly streamlined package. Frontman Britt Daniel is as enigmatic and evocative as ever, conjuring a tender love affair over the flickering chords of “Paper Tiger” and drawing on rangy, looping piano to channel youthful anomie on “The Way We Get By.” Simultaneously spare and sonically dense, romantic and reserved, percussive and sweetly melodic, Kill the Moonlight is a testament to using minimalism for maximum effect.

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