14 Songs, 53 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Like Beanie Sigel’s prior releases, The Solution displays a lyrical mastermind who nonetheless faces an identity crisis when it comes to marketing himself. The album jumps from radio crossovers (“All of the Above”) to concrete body slams (“You Ain’t Ready for Me”) to party songs (“Pass the Patron”). Beanie appears with the most unlikely range of guests imaginable, from Ozzy Osbourne (the Black Sabbath-sampling “Judgement Day”) to soft rock crooner James Blunt (“Dear Self”). Even on the song in which Beans plays ladies’ man (“I’m In”) he goes from buying surprise gifts for his women to “abusing ‘em and losing ‘em.” The album’s multiple layers of conflict culminate on “Dear Self,” which presents a conversation between Beanie’s split personalities: “Are you that plain ignorant? / You’re so indignant / Please come off that high chair you’re sitting in / Before you’re smashed from it or strapped to it / Your body used as a conduit / A thousand volts flow through you / Your life gone over something foolish.” While he may be far from finding a lasting solution to his inner turmoil, Beanie’s lyricism is more focused than ever.

Explicit

EDITORS’ NOTES

Like Beanie Sigel’s prior releases, The Solution displays a lyrical mastermind who nonetheless faces an identity crisis when it comes to marketing himself. The album jumps from radio crossovers (“All of the Above”) to concrete body slams (“You Ain’t Ready for Me”) to party songs (“Pass the Patron”). Beanie appears with the most unlikely range of guests imaginable, from Ozzy Osbourne (the Black Sabbath-sampling “Judgement Day”) to soft rock crooner James Blunt (“Dear Self”). Even on the song in which Beans plays ladies’ man (“I’m In”) he goes from buying surprise gifts for his women to “abusing ‘em and losing ‘em.” The album’s multiple layers of conflict culminate on “Dear Self,” which presents a conversation between Beanie’s split personalities: “Are you that plain ignorant? / You’re so indignant / Please come off that high chair you’re sitting in / Before you’re smashed from it or strapped to it / Your body used as a conduit / A thousand volts flow through you / Your life gone over something foolish.” While he may be far from finding a lasting solution to his inner turmoil, Beanie’s lyricism is more focused than ever.

Explicit
TITLE TIME
4:14
3:31
3:18
4:30
4:07
3:33
3:12
3:57
3:43
3:35
5:37
3:18
3:45
2:43

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5

87 Ratings

87 Ratings

best album of the years

bigcheeg,

beans is the truth this album is amazing its rock clubby and soul all at the same time and the lyric are crazy roc for life

Beans kills it

DeuCe P.,

From the beginning to the end, Sigs goes hard. Exactly what I expected and its great. A really really good album.

OtheJeweler of Double F Records

OtheJeweler,

The beats are ok but not for him but sigel go hard no matter what i like it (Styles & Sigel) The hardest out. Dont 4get about hell rell.The only thing i dont like is he use alot of other rappers raps but who dont

About Beanie Sigel

Philadelphian rapper Beanie Sigel had a rapidly rising career, beginning with his appearance on one of underground rapper/producer DJ Clue?'s mixtapes, to his cameos on Jay-Z's Vol. 2: Hard Knock Life, to a consequent solo deal with Roc-a-Fella Records. His distinctive, slightly drawling delivery and his clever but hard-hitting rhymes were showcased on his debut album, 2000's The Truth, which featured contributions from Jay-Z, Memphis Bleek, Eve, and Scarface, and production by the Ruff Ryders' Swizz Beatz and Suave House's Tony Draper. His second album, The Reason, hit the streets in summer 2001, led by the single "Beanie (Mack B****)." Sigel soon launched his State Property line of clothing by announcing his gear would have hidden pockets and gun holsters. Legal problems plagued the rapper in 2003 when he was arrested on federal weapon and drug charges stemming from a police chase where Sigel allegedly tossed a loaded handgun. He was arrested again in September the same year on attempted murder charges for allegedly shooting a man in the stomach. The attempted murder trial was thrown out of court once already by the beginning of 2005, but was set to be retried while Sigel was pleading guilty to the federal weapon charges. Preparing for jail, Sigel went into high gear and completed a movie, an album, and five videos to support the new album. The album, The B. Coming, hit the shelves in March of 2005 while the movie, State Property 2, was released in April. Out of prison by the end of the year, Sigel went to work on his fourth album, The Solution; though there seemed to be fluctuations in Sigel's stance in the split between Jay-Z and Damon Dash, the rapper remained with Jay-Z, on Roc-a-Fella, and The Solution was issued in December 2007. His 2009 effort The Broad Street Bully was issued by the Siccness label with the message that it is "not an official studio album," but a "street release." That official album, This Time, arrived in 2012 on the Ruffhouse label and right before Sigel returned to prison, this time on a two-year tax evasion charge. ~ Heather Phares

  • ORIGIN
    Philadelphia, PA
  • BORN
    March 6, 1974

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