10 Songs, 38 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

1976’s Some People Can Do What They Like was Robert Palmer’s third solo album in as many years. Especially in the disheveled '70s, such a pace was likely to dull an artist’s creativity, but this release its every bit equal to—if not superior to—its superb predecessors. The album continues Palmer’s association with Little Feat, the band that did everything for him except make him an official member. Though the Feats were best known for their jams, Palmer brought out the group's rhythmic prowess. “Keep in Touch” and “What Can You Bring Me” are formidable because they're stealthy. While other blue-eyed English soul men had a tendency to embarrass themselves with exaggeration, Palmer’s specialty was his understatement. His songs are never rushed, and though the instrumentation is sometimes thick, it's never dense. Rock critics remained incredulous that Palmer didn't become a bigger star, but the truth is he was more of a musician’s musician. Whereas the big funk and rock stars of the late '70s emphasized volume and hooks, Some People Can Do What They Like invests fully in interplay, subtlety, and richness of tone.

EDITORS’ NOTES

1976’s Some People Can Do What They Like was Robert Palmer’s third solo album in as many years. Especially in the disheveled '70s, such a pace was likely to dull an artist’s creativity, but this release its every bit equal to—if not superior to—its superb predecessors. The album continues Palmer’s association with Little Feat, the band that did everything for him except make him an official member. Though the Feats were best known for their jams, Palmer brought out the group's rhythmic prowess. “Keep in Touch” and “What Can You Bring Me” are formidable because they're stealthy. While other blue-eyed English soul men had a tendency to embarrass themselves with exaggeration, Palmer’s specialty was his understatement. His songs are never rushed, and though the instrumentation is sometimes thick, it's never dense. Rock critics remained incredulous that Palmer didn't become a bigger star, but the truth is he was more of a musician’s musician. Whereas the big funk and rock stars of the late '70s emphasized volume and hooks, Some People Can Do What They Like invests fully in interplay, subtlety, and richness of tone.

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