12 Songs, 44 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Some People Change went gold in 2006 with three hits on the country charts, starting with an inspired title track that was first recorded by Kenny Chesney on 2004's When The Sun Goes Down. "Some People Change" is a gospel-tinged country rock hymn with humble lyrics about giving folks a second chance to learn from their mistakes. The uplifting tune floats on vintage organ drones before unfolding to reveal the soaring, soulful harmonies of a huge church choir. With its blessings-counting lyrics, God loving sentiment, and classic American honky-tonk ballad song structure, it's no surprise that "Lucky Man" became the duo's third ever number one hit. "What Do Ya Think About That" didn't chart as high, but it's a funny little single that rips on the nosy neighbors and gossip mavens of heartland suburbia. "Hey Country" is an outstanding track which starts off sounding so similar to the intro riff of Heart's "Magic Man" that you have to wonder if Ann and Nancy Wilson would be put off or flattered. And though these ballads are as good as any, Montgomery Gentry shine best when fusing a 1970s country rock base with modern production like on "Free Ride In The Fast Lane."

EDITORS’ NOTES

Some People Change went gold in 2006 with three hits on the country charts, starting with an inspired title track that was first recorded by Kenny Chesney on 2004's When The Sun Goes Down. "Some People Change" is a gospel-tinged country rock hymn with humble lyrics about giving folks a second chance to learn from their mistakes. The uplifting tune floats on vintage organ drones before unfolding to reveal the soaring, soulful harmonies of a huge church choir. With its blessings-counting lyrics, God loving sentiment, and classic American honky-tonk ballad song structure, it's no surprise that "Lucky Man" became the duo's third ever number one hit. "What Do Ya Think About That" didn't chart as high, but it's a funny little single that rips on the nosy neighbors and gossip mavens of heartland suburbia. "Hey Country" is an outstanding track which starts off sounding so similar to the intro riff of Heart's "Magic Man" that you have to wonder if Ann and Nancy Wilson would be put off or flattered. And though these ballads are as good as any, Montgomery Gentry shine best when fusing a 1970s country rock base with modern production like on "Free Ride In The Fast Lane."

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