17 Songs, 55 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

While much of the British Invasion featured groups with heavy blues and R&B influences, The Zombies worked a more baroque pop angle, and their "Time of the Season" became a radio staple just after the band called it a day. Vocalist Colin Blunstone was lured away from a potential insurance career when his old bandmates Rod Argent and Chris White helped him work up One Year, a solo album that proved he still had plenty left in the tank. This collection features seven tracks from One Year, four from its excellent follow-up, Ennismore, and four more from the lesser-known Journey album. The beauty of Russ Ballard's "I Don't Believe in Miracles" and Blunstone's own "Though You Are Far Away" and "How Could We Dare to Be Wrong" are among the most compelling songs of the early '70s, while Denny Laine's "Say You Don't Mind" is closer to Blunstone's pop roots in The Zombies. Blunstone has experienced a modest rediscovery over the years, but his fan base isn't as big as it should be considering his natural talents.

EDITORS’ NOTES

While much of the British Invasion featured groups with heavy blues and R&B influences, The Zombies worked a more baroque pop angle, and their "Time of the Season" became a radio staple just after the band called it a day. Vocalist Colin Blunstone was lured away from a potential insurance career when his old bandmates Rod Argent and Chris White helped him work up One Year, a solo album that proved he still had plenty left in the tank. This collection features seven tracks from One Year, four from its excellent follow-up, Ennismore, and four more from the lesser-known Journey album. The beauty of Russ Ballard's "I Don't Believe in Miracles" and Blunstone's own "Though You Are Far Away" and "How Could We Dare to Be Wrong" are among the most compelling songs of the early '70s, while Denny Laine's "Say You Don't Mind" is closer to Blunstone's pop roots in The Zombies. Blunstone has experienced a modest rediscovery over the years, but his fan base isn't as big as it should be considering his natural talents.

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About Colin Blunstone

As the lead singer of the Zombies, Blunstone was one of the greatest '60s rock vocalists, pacing the group's minor-key masterpieces with his inimitable choked and breathy vocals. After retiring from the business briefly in the late '60s (to work in the insurance industry, of all things), he went solo in the early '70s with a string of interesting pop/rock albums that were more of an extension of the late Zombies sound than the more well-known work of Argent, the other Zombies spin-off act. The Zombies connection is hardly incidental; chief Zombie songwriters Rod Argent and Chris White gave Blunstone some songs, as did Argent member Russ Ballard, though Blunstone penned much of his material himself. With their moody melodies and Baroque touches of muted keyboards, classical guitars, and inventive string arrangements, his early-'70s albums sometimes sounded like a mellower take on the direction the Zombies pursued with their pop-psychedelic masterwork Odessey and Oracle. Blunstone managed some small British hits with "How Could We Dare Be Wrong," "I Don't Believe in Miracles," and the Top 20 single "Say You Don't Mind," a cover of a tune written and recorded by Denny Laine after he left the Moody Blues and before he joined Wings. Blunstone's first album, One Year (1971), was his best, though the follow-ups Ennismore and Journey also had their moments. ~ Richie Unterberger

HOMETOWN
Hatfield, England
GENRE
Rock
BORN
June 24, 1945

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