Acrobats (Bonus Version) by Peggy Sue on Apple Music

12 Songs

EDITORS’ NOTES

Departing from the dark acoustic folk of its debut, Peggy Sue reveals a harder edge on its second release. The opener, “Cut My Teeth,” signals this new direction with squalling electric guitar riffs and an intensity that carries through to the rest of the album. Featuring multi-instrumentalists and singers Rosa Slade and Katy Young and drummer Olly Joyce, this British trio creates heavy atmosphere on Acrobats under the guidance of John Parish, PJ Harvey’s producer. With songs ranging from noisy and wiry to murky and dense, the group elicits a visceral reaction that's often unsettling, yet punctuated with moments of quiet beauty. Even when the guitars crunch and the rhythms get sludgy, Slade and Young’s remarkable intertwining harmonies keep the songs from bogging down. They mesh especially well on the vocal-driven “Parking Meter Blues” (accompanied only by light percussion and glockenspiel) and the relatively sunny “Boxes.” Joyce’s dynamic and nuanced timekeeping deserves special mention, as his drumming is critical in getting across the album’s menacing mood.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Departing from the dark acoustic folk of its debut, Peggy Sue reveals a harder edge on its second release. The opener, “Cut My Teeth,” signals this new direction with squalling electric guitar riffs and an intensity that carries through to the rest of the album. Featuring multi-instrumentalists and singers Rosa Slade and Katy Young and drummer Olly Joyce, this British trio creates heavy atmosphere on Acrobats under the guidance of John Parish, PJ Harvey’s producer. With songs ranging from noisy and wiry to murky and dense, the group elicits a visceral reaction that's often unsettling, yet punctuated with moments of quiet beauty. Even when the guitars crunch and the rhythms get sludgy, Slade and Young’s remarkable intertwining harmonies keep the songs from bogging down. They mesh especially well on the vocal-driven “Parking Meter Blues” (accompanied only by light percussion and glockenspiel) and the relatively sunny “Boxes.” Joyce’s dynamic and nuanced timekeeping deserves special mention, as his drumming is critical in getting across the album’s menacing mood.

TITLE TIME
6:17
3:47
4:23
4:15
4:31
3:21
4:18
2:57
4:13
4:14
3:31
3:47

About Peggy Sue

Brighton, England indie folk duo Peggy Sue was formed by longtime friends Rosa Slade and Katy Young. The group's signature blend of brooding anti-folk and fiery indie pop was born in basements, living rooms, and small clubs in 2006. A successful tour with like-minded British indie rockers Mumford & Sons earned Peggy Sue attention outside of the local scene, resulting in a record deal with Yep Roc in the States, and Wichita Records in the U.K.. The band’s debut album, Fossils and Other Phantoms, was released in June 2010, with Acrobats arriving the following year. Their widely praised sophomore record took a step away from the slightly twee folk sound of their debut and introduced electric guitars and moody, indie rock-influenced melodies that were bolstered by the addition of drummer Olly Joyce. Toward the end of 2011 they performed at a temporary cinema in Hackney, London, where they played an interpretation of the rock & roll soundtrack to cult film Scorpio Rising. They went into the studio with Jimmy Robertson to record the versions, which appeared as a limited-edition run of LPs in 2012. The trio took their time to write their third studio release and returned to the studio with Robertson in 2013 to lay down tracks for Choir of Echoes, which arrived in January 2014. ~ James Christopher Monger & Scott Kerr

  • ORIGIN
    Brighton, England
  • FORMED
    2006

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