6 Songs, 25 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

In the manner of Jon Foreman’s series of seasoned-themed releases, Andrew Osenga has chosen to make his latest work available in serial EP rather than LP form. Soul—the second in this four-part series—is in keeping with the Christian singer/songwriter’s high standards lyrically and musically. The much-abused term “sensitive” comes to mind when describing Osenga’s work—his take on faith allows for human frailty and even a little wry humor. On Soul, he leans toward both rootsy rhythms and lounge-jazz polish, tying such contrasting strands together with his winsome, clean-toned vocals. Most of the songs touch on a touring musician’s longing for the pleasures of home, a theme most explicitly stated in the simmering ballad “Leave It While I Love It.” Sly comments about the music business spice up the elegant “Just Be,” while “Don’t Lose Heart” offers encouragement to a Southern-slanted gospel groove. “The Bird Who Was Friday” catches Osenga at his folkiest and quirkiest. “Who we are is who we love,” he declares in “Soul on Fire,” neatly summing up the EP’s generous, family-centered spirit.

EDITORS’ NOTES

In the manner of Jon Foreman’s series of seasoned-themed releases, Andrew Osenga has chosen to make his latest work available in serial EP rather than LP form. Soul—the second in this four-part series—is in keeping with the Christian singer/songwriter’s high standards lyrically and musically. The much-abused term “sensitive” comes to mind when describing Osenga’s work—his take on faith allows for human frailty and even a little wry humor. On Soul, he leans toward both rootsy rhythms and lounge-jazz polish, tying such contrasting strands together with his winsome, clean-toned vocals. Most of the songs touch on a touring musician’s longing for the pleasures of home, a theme most explicitly stated in the simmering ballad “Leave It While I Love It.” Sly comments about the music business spice up the elegant “Just Be,” while “Don’t Lose Heart” offers encouragement to a Southern-slanted gospel groove. “The Bird Who Was Friday” catches Osenga at his folkiest and quirkiest. “Who we are is who we love,” he declares in “Soul on Fire,” neatly summing up the EP’s generous, family-centered spirit.

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