8 Songs, 53 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The sound of mid-’60s Miles Davis is all over trumpeter Jeremy Pelt’s fine 2012 release, Soul. (The opening track, “Second Love,” immediately evokes the compositions that Wayne Shorter wrote for Davis’ group.) Pelt has an amazingly pure tone, and his playing is superb throughout. The band members—tenor saxophonist J.D. Allen, pianist Danny Grissett, bassist Dwayne Burno, and drummer Gerald Cleaver—have clearly spent a lot of time playing together. They're excellent soloists, and every note feels both fluid and considered. The two non-originals here are pleasing. Guest vocalist Joanna Pascale does a nice job on Sammy Cahn’s “Moondrift,” where the band provides sensitive accompaniment, and there’s a nicely rendered version of George Cables’ “Sweet Rita Suite Part 2: Her Soul,” which features a muted trumpet statement. Most of the tracks move at a slow to medium pace, but the outfit can shift into high gear with ease; just check out the uptempo burner “What’s Wrong Is Right.” Pelt’s exciting solo is riveting every step of the way, and it might be the highlight of Soul.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The sound of mid-’60s Miles Davis is all over trumpeter Jeremy Pelt’s fine 2012 release, Soul. (The opening track, “Second Love,” immediately evokes the compositions that Wayne Shorter wrote for Davis’ group.) Pelt has an amazingly pure tone, and his playing is superb throughout. The band members—tenor saxophonist J.D. Allen, pianist Danny Grissett, bassist Dwayne Burno, and drummer Gerald Cleaver—have clearly spent a lot of time playing together. They're excellent soloists, and every note feels both fluid and considered. The two non-originals here are pleasing. Guest vocalist Joanna Pascale does a nice job on Sammy Cahn’s “Moondrift,” where the band provides sensitive accompaniment, and there’s a nicely rendered version of George Cables’ “Sweet Rita Suite Part 2: Her Soul,” which features a muted trumpet statement. Most of the tracks move at a slow to medium pace, but the outfit can shift into high gear with ease; just check out the uptempo burner “What’s Wrong Is Right.” Pelt’s exciting solo is riveting every step of the way, and it might be the highlight of Soul.

TITLE TIME
5:17
6:21
6:31
8:36
6:20
3:46
11:19
5:30

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5

45 Ratings

45 Ratings

THIS is Jazz in 2012

CoolFreeHardBop3,

OK, listen up everybody. This is Jazz. If you like it, I'm hip. If you don't like it ,move on. Jeremy, J.D., Danny, Dwayne and Gerald are putting down some fantastic post-bop/modal music that has nothing to do with "smooth jazz" or any of that crap. So, buy it, play it, and let the music seep into your soul. THAT is what makes Jazz so special.

By
CoolBlues1956 - STILL Educating the squares (since 1896). Be FREE my friend.

A cousin to Kind Of Blue... Great late night stuff

twomoonmusic,

Jeremy Pelt Soul Great! Love it. Refined, recessed playing. My introduction to Pelt and I am sold...

Stunning, along the lines of Miles Davis' Kind of Blue

Brierman,

Gorgeous. Airy.

STUNNING harmonies. Never rushed showing the maturity for the beauty to come through.

WOW. Buy it. Embrace it.

It's food for your ears...

About Jeremy Pelt

Trumpeter Jeremy Pelt is a firebrand jazz artist in the tradition of Lee Morgan and Freddie Hubbard. Born on November 4, 1976 in Southern California, Pelt first began playing the trumpet in elementary school, focusing on classical studies. However, it was not until joining his high school jazz band that he became strongly interested in changing directions and pursuing jazz full-time. This led to studying jazz improvisation and film scoring at Berklee College of Music in Boston, where he earned his B.A. in professional music. Since graduating from college, Pelt has performed and/or recorded with some of the jazz world's most high-profile players, including Roy Hargrove, Ravi Coltrane, Greg Osby, Cassandra Wilson, and the Mingus Big Band, among others. He released his solo debut, Profile, for Fresh Sound in 2002. A year later, Pelt returned with Insight on Criss Cross. From 2003 to 2008, he released several albums for Maxjazz, including Close to My Heart, Identity, Shock Value: Live at Smoke, and November, all of which showcased his growing facility on the trumpet and penchant for progressive, harmonically adventurous post-bop and modal jazz.

In 2010, Pelt moved to High Note and released the mid-'60s Miles Davis-influenced Men of Honor. Sticking with the same ensemble, Pelt released the similarly inclined The Talented Mr. Pelt in 2011, followed by Soul in 2012. The album was celebrated by several magazines and music websites as one of the finest jazz albums of the year. Pelt then returned with two funk, Brazilian, and electronic-infused releases with 2013's Water and Earth and 2014's Face Forward, Jeremy.

In 2015, Pelt delivered his 12th studio album, Tales, Musings, and Other Reveries, which featured his two-drummer quintet with percussionists Billy Drummond and Victor Lewis. For 2016's #Jiveculture, Pelt returned to a more straight-ahead acoustic quartet format featuring Drummond, pianist Danny Grissett, and legendary bassist Ron Carter. Small group acoustic jazz and Afro-Latin rhythms were were also the focus for 2017's Make Noise!, featuring pianist Victor Gould, bassist Vicente Archer, drummer Jonathan Barber, and percussionist Jacquelene Acevedo. ~ Matt Collar

  • ORIGIN
    Los Angeles, CA
  • GENRE
    Jazz
  • BORN
    September 4, 1976

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