17 Songs, 1 Hour 4 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Originally tacked onto a Christmas compilation for LaFace Records, “Player’s Ball” introduced the world not only to Outkast but to a new slant on how hip-hop could look, feel, and sound. By the time their debut album came out six months later—spring 1993, halfway between Doggystyle and Ready to Die—the duo had evolved from curiosity to contenders, avatars of a supposedly “Southern” style classified by region because no other classification worked. Laidback but alert, grounded but reflective, the music mixed rubbery synths with live-band funk instrumentation for a sound that elided the macho clichés dominating rap at the time without ever being preachy.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Originally tacked onto a Christmas compilation for LaFace Records, “Player’s Ball” introduced the world not only to Outkast but to a new slant on how hip-hop could look, feel, and sound. By the time their debut album came out six months later—spring 1993, halfway between Doggystyle and Ready to Die—the duo had evolved from curiosity to contenders, avatars of a supposedly “Southern” style classified by region because no other classification worked. Laidback but alert, grounded but reflective, the music mixed rubbery synths with live-band funk instrumentation for a sound that elided the macho clichés dominating rap at the time without ever being preachy.

TITLE TIME

More By Outkast

You May Also Like