11 Songs, 57 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

As anyone who fondly remembers their tripped-out version of The Supremes’ “You Keep Me Hangin’ On” can tell you, Vanilla Fudge were a key link between psychedelia and heavy metal and truly enjoyed turning pop songs into prog-rock epics that no one else would’ve dared. With three-quarters of their original lineup and Cactus bassist Pete Bremy replacing Tim Bogert, they attack the popular songs of 1967 as only they can. The Box Tops’ “The Letter” is over the top, while The Who’s “I Can See for Miles” sounds somewhere between The Doors and Deep Purple. The Rolling Stones’ “Ruby Tuesday” is completely blown out to glorious excess.

EDITORS’ NOTES

As anyone who fondly remembers their tripped-out version of The Supremes’ “You Keep Me Hangin’ On” can tell you, Vanilla Fudge were a key link between psychedelia and heavy metal and truly enjoyed turning pop songs into prog-rock epics that no one else would’ve dared. With three-quarters of their original lineup and Cactus bassist Pete Bremy replacing Tim Bogert, they attack the popular songs of 1967 as only they can. The Box Tops’ “The Letter” is over the top, while The Who’s “I Can See for Miles” sounds somewhere between The Doors and Deep Purple. The Rolling Stones’ “Ruby Tuesday” is completely blown out to glorious excess.

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