12 Songs, 48 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Hot from 2013’s Summer Horns collaboration with Dave Koz and others, Gerald Albright now returns to the solo spotlight. Literally; Albright provides not just alto saxophone but flute, electric bass, and vocals as well. An album with a classic Philly soul gloss to it, Slam Dunk tips off with the uptempo title cut, which has a midtempo groove and just the right amount of edginess in the production. Peabo Bryson stops by for a shimmering version of “Where Did We Go Wrong?,” which carries on the chemistry the two established on Bryson’s “Show and Tell.” There are also a few covers worth checking into, including Albright’s surprisingly subtle but burning version of James Brown’s “It's a Man's, Man's, Man’s World” and a percolating version of Cyndi Lauper's “True Colors.” Albright also pays tribute to George Duke on “The Duke,” honoring his mentor with one of the album's best songs. Strong on melody but with attention to groove and harmonic detail, this is up to Albright’s usual high standards.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Hot from 2013’s Summer Horns collaboration with Dave Koz and others, Gerald Albright now returns to the solo spotlight. Literally; Albright provides not just alto saxophone but flute, electric bass, and vocals as well. An album with a classic Philly soul gloss to it, Slam Dunk tips off with the uptempo title cut, which has a midtempo groove and just the right amount of edginess in the production. Peabo Bryson stops by for a shimmering version of “Where Did We Go Wrong?,” which carries on the chemistry the two established on Bryson’s “Show and Tell.” There are also a few covers worth checking into, including Albright’s surprisingly subtle but burning version of James Brown’s “It's a Man's, Man's, Man’s World” and a percolating version of Cyndi Lauper's “True Colors.” Albright also pays tribute to George Duke on “The Duke,” honoring his mentor with one of the album's best songs. Strong on melody but with attention to groove and harmonic detail, this is up to Albright’s usual high standards.

TITLE TIME
4:39
5:33
5:16
5:43
4:17
1:30
4:13
4:46
3:03
4:37
0:39
4:27

About Gerald Albright

Beginning in the late '80s, saxophone master Gerald Albright recorded numerous successful solo albums for Atlantic when he wasn't busy assisting an impressive, and mammoth, roster of popular R&B artists. Born in South Central Los Angeles, the saxophonist idolized James Brown and took much influence from Maceo Parker and Cannonball Adderley. He first made a name for himself within the music industry during the '80s, when he became a highly requested session musician. His revered reputation resulted in a solo contract with Atlantic Records. His first album for the label, Just Between Us, introduced him to the masses in 1987. Several more albums followed, including Dream Come True in 1990, Live at Birdland West in 1991, Smooth in 1994, and Live to Love in 1997.

Albright moved from Atlantic to GRP in 2002 for the Groovology album, his first in over five years, and continued to maintain his busy schedule as a session man. His second GRP album, Kickin' It Up, followed in 2004. Two years later he appeared on Peak Records, which released New Beginnings. In 2010, his album Pushing the Envelope landed on the Heads Up label. In 2012, Albright paired with guitarist Norman Brown for the Concord release 24/7. Two years later, he returned with his 14th studio album, Slam Dunk. It was his 12th consecutive album to reach the Top Ten of Billboard's jazz album chart. In 2016, Albright delivered G, his first album for his own Bright Music Records label. ~ Jason Birchmeier

  • ORIGIN
    Los Angeles, CA
  • BORN
    1957

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