12 Songs, 1 Hour 1 Minute

EDITORS’ NOTES

Tori Amos attacks a wide range of material on this collection of covers — punk rockers, rappers, classic rockers — often reinventing the tunes to the point where they’ve become new songs. She isn’t one for complacency and always seeks a challenge. The Velvet Underground’s “New Age” becomes a muffled electric piano ballad that’s kept under wraps until its spiraling climax. Eminem’s “’97 Bonnie and Clyde” turns from a hip-hop fantasy to a whispered singer-songwriter confessional with a sawing string section chasing Amos’ phone booth vocal. Tom Waits’ “Time” retains its downtrodden hope in the face of sorrow. The Beatles’ compact and complex “Happiness Is a Warm Gun” is given a full makeover over ten minutes. Neil Young’s “Heart of Gold” is tripped up into the modern era with extra beats and ferocious electric guitar. Both the Beatles and Young are rendered nearly unrecognizable. The Boomtown Rats’ “I Don’t Like Mondays” keeps its solid hook with the song’s tragedy becoming more clear as a solemn piano ballad. Depeche Mode’s “Enjoy the Silence” settles for a piano, strings and Amos’ taunting backing vocals heightening the tension.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Tori Amos attacks a wide range of material on this collection of covers — punk rockers, rappers, classic rockers — often reinventing the tunes to the point where they’ve become new songs. She isn’t one for complacency and always seeks a challenge. The Velvet Underground’s “New Age” becomes a muffled electric piano ballad that’s kept under wraps until its spiraling climax. Eminem’s “’97 Bonnie and Clyde” turns from a hip-hop fantasy to a whispered singer-songwriter confessional with a sawing string section chasing Amos’ phone booth vocal. Tom Waits’ “Time” retains its downtrodden hope in the face of sorrow. The Beatles’ compact and complex “Happiness Is a Warm Gun” is given a full makeover over ten minutes. Neil Young’s “Heart of Gold” is tripped up into the modern era with extra beats and ferocious electric guitar. Both the Beatles and Young are rendered nearly unrecognizable. The Boomtown Rats’ “I Don’t Like Mondays” keeps its solid hook with the song’s tragedy becoming more clear as a solemn piano ballad. Depeche Mode’s “Enjoy the Silence” settles for a piano, strings and Amos’ taunting backing vocals heightening the tension.

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.2 out of 5
64 Ratings

64 Ratings

StrangeReviewrr ,

Don't listen to the iTunes review.

There is nothing uninteresting about this record, and all of the covers are drastically different than the original versions (most of them are much more interesting in my opinion). As far as the concept of the album, which is why I'm writing this review, go google things. Find the stories/inspirations of each of the songs and everything will come clear(if it even matters to you). Find out for yourself before listening to some random review and passing up an amazing album. Regardless of the concept, the production on this album is much better than her albums in the past. The vocals feel as if she's singing right beside you on a few tracks, and the instrumental quality is flawless. If you love music, check out this album.

Astroboy6791 ,

Strange Little Girls?

Strange little girls, indeed. I really liked Enjoy the Silence and I'm Not In Love. The other covers were a little too out there for me.

carahudsonerdman ,

Sorry

I missed Tori's songwriting ability in this album. Basically this album (for me) was Tori mixing up other people's songs. Sorry, Tori.

More By Tori Amos

You May Also Like