11 Songs, 37 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

You might call this New York–based singer/songwriter's work “confessional,” except that the term implies emotional histrionics and self-dramatization. Dressner comes across as understated, almost demure, making her poignant lyrics seem all the more telling. Her waif-like voice and gently flowing melodies reinforce the bittersweet content of tunes like “Fly,” “How Am I Supposed to Be?,” and “When I See Stars.” Some tracks (especially the haunting “Come Back”) are painfully unguarded; others, like the happy/sad “Brooklyn,” are sparse sketches of fleeting moments. The slowly unfolding ache of “With You” is an especially lovely moment. Not all is melancholy here—“Hardy Boys” provides a burst of country-pop high spirits. As producer, Anthony Rizzo dresses up the acoustic-based tunes in tremulous electric guitars and quivering keyboards, giving the tracks a shimmery feel akin to such '80s post-punk acts as Throwing Muses or Rain Parade. “You gotta find me,” Dressner sings toward the album’s close. Fortunately, she’s an artist worth seeking out.

EDITORS’ NOTES

You might call this New York–based singer/songwriter's work “confessional,” except that the term implies emotional histrionics and self-dramatization. Dressner comes across as understated, almost demure, making her poignant lyrics seem all the more telling. Her waif-like voice and gently flowing melodies reinforce the bittersweet content of tunes like “Fly,” “How Am I Supposed to Be?,” and “When I See Stars.” Some tracks (especially the haunting “Come Back”) are painfully unguarded; others, like the happy/sad “Brooklyn,” are sparse sketches of fleeting moments. The slowly unfolding ache of “With You” is an especially lovely moment. Not all is melancholy here—“Hardy Boys” provides a burst of country-pop high spirits. As producer, Anthony Rizzo dresses up the acoustic-based tunes in tremulous electric guitars and quivering keyboards, giving the tracks a shimmery feel akin to such '80s post-punk acts as Throwing Muses or Rain Parade. “You gotta find me,” Dressner sings toward the album’s close. Fortunately, she’s an artist worth seeking out.

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3:23
3:25
3:22
3:21
3:25
3:43
3:14
3:23
2:30
2:25
4:51

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