12 Songs, 46 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Without naming names, it can justifiably be generalized that most modern rock bands using loud electric guitars tend to get softer with age. The Chicago power trio Chevelle proves otherwise with its 2012 roundup of cherry-picked gems that span its six-album career. A remastered version of “Jars” from 2009’s Sci-Fi Crimes kicks off the nonchronological Stray Arrows—A Collection of Favorites with post-adolescent angst and a life-after-grunge style of rock that has more in common with Tool and Helmet than Nickelback and Creed. "Same Old Trip" from 2011's Hats Off to the Bull follows, better exemplifying Chevelle’s preference for substance over flash with a song that balances angst and melody. The band's ability to create sublime song hooks—the kind that get lodged deeper in your head with repeated listens—surfaces in “Vitamin R (Leading Us Along)," which smolders with palpable tension and raw emotion. Both “Face to the Floor” and “Hats Off to the Bull” exude more seething anger and aggression than any of Chevelle's preceding recordings, especially the latter with its seething chorus.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Without naming names, it can justifiably be generalized that most modern rock bands using loud electric guitars tend to get softer with age. The Chicago power trio Chevelle proves otherwise with its 2012 roundup of cherry-picked gems that span its six-album career. A remastered version of “Jars” from 2009’s Sci-Fi Crimes kicks off the nonchronological Stray Arrows—A Collection of Favorites with post-adolescent angst and a life-after-grunge style of rock that has more in common with Tool and Helmet than Nickelback and Creed. "Same Old Trip" from 2011's Hats Off to the Bull follows, better exemplifying Chevelle’s preference for substance over flash with a song that balances angst and melody. The band's ability to create sublime song hooks—the kind that get lodged deeper in your head with repeated listens—surfaces in “Vitamin R (Leading Us Along)," which smolders with palpable tension and raw emotion. Both “Face to the Floor” and “Hats Off to the Bull” exude more seething anger and aggression than any of Chevelle's preceding recordings, especially the latter with its seething chorus.

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