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Gladiator (Music from the Motion Picture)

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Album Review

This second soundtrack compilation for Ridley Scott's sword and toga epic, Gladiator, hit stores nine months after the movie's initial release. It was timed to capitalize on the film's front-runner status in the 2000 Oscar horse race, but it would be shortsighted to dismiss the disc as a wholly mercenary attempt to milk the Gladiator cash cow. Perhaps such claims would be warranted if Gladiator: More Music From the Motion Picture were what its title implies: a collection of excerpts from the film's original soundtrack that were left off of the first album. The initial album, Gladiator: Music From the Motion Picture, remains more than adequate as a summary of a highly eclectic and effective score which is not only Hans Zimmer's finest composition (thanks in large part to contributions by former Dead Can Dance vocalist Lisa Gerrard) but also one of the most original facets of an otherwise overblown and overrated blockbuster action flick. Thankfully, the second Gladiator CD is not merely an accumulation of leftover scraps of music. Rather, it is a fascinating audio diary, an inside look at the process of composing a film score. Zimmer's liner notes provide detailed accounts of the stories behind each discarded outtake and incomplete draft. One track is a fabulous vodka-inspired late-night jam between Zimmer's synthesizers and strings, Djivan Gasparyan's duduk, and Heitor Periera's Spanish guitar. Another is a faster, African-influenced version of Gerrard's stirring end credit theme, "Now We Are Free," that was abandoned for being too cheerful. It is clear from listening to the CD that these recordings were not rejected because the music was of an inferior quality to the final versions. In fact, some of these pieces are more inventive and listenable than anything on the soundtrack. They were cut simply because they did not meet the requirements of the narrative. Gladiator: More Music From the Motion Picture demonstrates strikingly not only how creative but also how exacting, meticulous, practical, and utilitarian a film composer must be.

Customer Reviews

=D

every time i listen to now we are free, i start to cry...i think that its a beautiful song

Easily The Best Soundtrack

In my humble opinion, this is Hans Zimmer's best work yet. The Battle and Barbarian Horde are my personal favorites, but Patricide is also good as well. Overall, an awesome album.

Amazing music!

I have fallen in love with this music. It is very moving, even to those who have not yet seen the film. Mr. Zimmer got it completely right with this one. If you don't have the soundtrack already, get it now!

Biography

Born: September 12, 1957 in Frankfurt, Germany

Genre: Soundtrack

Years Active: '70s, '80s, '90s, '00s, '10s

One of the most prolific film composers of the late 20th and early 21st centuries, Hans Zimmer was born September 12, 1957 in Frankfurt, Germany. After relocating to London as a teen, he later wrote advertising jingles for Air-Edel Associates, and in 1980 collaborated with the Buggles on their LP The Age of Plastic and its accompanying hit "Video Killed the Radio Star." A stint with Ultravox followed before Zimmer next surfaced with the Italian avant-garde group Krisma; he then formed a partnership...
Full Bio
Gladiator (Music from the Motion Picture), Hans Zimmer
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