8 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This album is Mastered for iTunes. Anxious to explore the expanding sonic options of the electronic age while also sensing a shift in the hard rock marketplace, Rush softened their guitar-based attack to implement a heavier dependence on synthesizers and an emphasis on the moodier aspects of their sound. The change is announced with the opening keyboard purr of “Subdivisions,” a dead accurate if wordy investigation (drummer Neal Peart is the one member who reluctantly curtails his excesses) into the travails of adolescence. From there, the beats syncopate nearer to New Wave while the songs deal less with sci-fi imaginings and adhere closer to real life. “The Analog Kid,” “The Weapon” and “New World Man” all race forth with a surging energy appropriate to the era. While older fans may have been stunned by these concessions to modern fashion, the results are an invigorated power trio firing on all cylinders. “Losing It,” featuring Ben Mink on electric violin, is a mature reflection on artistic decline, while “Countdown” observes the space shuttle launch with enviable audio verite.

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This album is Mastered for iTunes. Anxious to explore the expanding sonic options of the electronic age while also sensing a shift in the hard rock marketplace, Rush softened their guitar-based attack to implement a heavier dependence on synthesizers and an emphasis on the moodier aspects of their sound. The change is announced with the opening keyboard purr of “Subdivisions,” a dead accurate if wordy investigation (drummer Neal Peart is the one member who reluctantly curtails his excesses) into the travails of adolescence. From there, the beats syncopate nearer to New Wave while the songs deal less with sci-fi imaginings and adhere closer to real life. “The Analog Kid,” “The Weapon” and “New World Man” all race forth with a surging energy appropriate to the era. While older fans may have been stunned by these concessions to modern fashion, the results are an invigorated power trio firing on all cylinders. “Losing It,” featuring Ben Mink on electric violin, is a mature reflection on artistic decline, while “Countdown” observes the space shuttle launch with enviable audio verite.

Mastered for iTunes
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Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
58 Ratings
58 Ratings
Less Fortunate Son ,

All very good.

This is the album that marked the beginning to their as I like to call it "mainstream period" similar to many prog acts (Genesis, Yes) of the time. Don't doubt the albums ability it's still one of my opinion their best if not the best Rush album. "Subdivisions" dare I say is a better album opener than both "Spirit" and "Tom Sawyer" from the previous albums and like the others sets the tone to what we are listening to. The real gems here are actually the less popular "Chemistry" and "Losing It." The first having a very good beat and showing off how keyboards and guitar can work together in harmony, and the second being a soothing ballad telling a not so soothing tale with the sweet essance of electric violin with a fantastic solo at the end.

MaliTunes ,

New World Man

is STILL the highest-charting and only Top 40 single for Rush. Despite how popular and great Tom Sawyer is. That says everything about the public.

AK82 ,

Perfection

My favorite album on this planet.

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