12 Songs, 31 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

It’s fair to say that Jonathan Edwards’ claim to fame as a recording artist rests upon “Sunshine,” the hit tune found on his 1971 debut album. But this feisty number — a personal declaration of independence set to a ringing acoustic guitar line — isn’t the only highlight on this song collection. Jonathan Edwards is a work of unpretentious folk-pop, with touches of bluegrass and old-time country that give it regional flavor. Edwards’ light, slightly drawling tenor and poetic lyric sensibility make his music easy to like and often hard to forget. Much of the material has a bucolic feel, with “Athens County,” “Cold Snow” and “Dusty Morning” conjuring up scenes from the American heartland. Evocative fiddle, mournful pedal steel and bittersweet piano (the latter contributed by Van Morrison sideman Jef Labes) give tracks like “Emma” and “The King” an introspective air. Livening things up are vigorous string-band workouts like “Train of Glory” and “Don’t Cry Blue,” as well as the honkytonk-styled “Shanty.” Jonathan Edwards is an album of down-to-earth virtues, mixing traditional verities with bohemian charm.

EDITORS’ NOTES

It’s fair to say that Jonathan Edwards’ claim to fame as a recording artist rests upon “Sunshine,” the hit tune found on his 1971 debut album. But this feisty number — a personal declaration of independence set to a ringing acoustic guitar line — isn’t the only highlight on this song collection. Jonathan Edwards is a work of unpretentious folk-pop, with touches of bluegrass and old-time country that give it regional flavor. Edwards’ light, slightly drawling tenor and poetic lyric sensibility make his music easy to like and often hard to forget. Much of the material has a bucolic feel, with “Athens County,” “Cold Snow” and “Dusty Morning” conjuring up scenes from the American heartland. Evocative fiddle, mournful pedal steel and bittersweet piano (the latter contributed by Van Morrison sideman Jef Labes) give tracks like “Emma” and “The King” an introspective air. Livening things up are vigorous string-band workouts like “Train of Glory” and “Don’t Cry Blue,” as well as the honkytonk-styled “Shanty.” Jonathan Edwards is an album of down-to-earth virtues, mixing traditional verities with bohemian charm.

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
35 Ratings
35 Ratings
Jules.Atlanta ,

*Heard Him**Met Him**Great Music*

Met Jonathan at the Hippiefest at Chastain in Atlanta. He was so nice and good looking! His voice in person is just as awesome is it is in digital! He did a new song acappella, had a great John Denver sound. Can't remember the name? For feel good music you gotta download Shanty, Sunshine & Emma.

beachcomber53 ,

Jonathan the Incredible

Jonathan Edwards is, in my opinion, one of the finest folk musicians ever. His clear, clean vocals combined with strong guitar playing and incredible harmonica make him better than many other more well-known artists. During the early 70's he put out some of the best acoustic music ever recorded, surrounding himself with other great talents who joined in on his recordings. If you like this album, try "Have Yourself a Good Time for Me", which in some ways is even better than this first and self-titled classic. Jonathan Edwards never got the recognition he deserved. He's one of the best.

misskittydkn ,

Jonathan Edwards

I know this is an oldie but I have loved it since it came out!!
I am happy to have it in a digital format!

More By Jonathan Edwards

You May Also Like