19 Songs, 57 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With the addition of Gram Parsons, the Byrds took a definitive step into country music. The group had previously aired this side — Porter Wagoner’s “A Satisfied Mind” on their second album Turn! Turn! Turn!, “Mr. Spaceman” from Fifth Dimension — but they’d never completely submerged themselves into a single genre. Parsons wrote the two original compositions, his sublime signature tune regarding his southern upbringing “Hickory Wind,” and the upbeat pedal-steel driven “One Hundred Years From Now.” For the rest, the group recruited from all over. Dylan’s “You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere” and “Nothing Was Delivered” (which later appeared on his Basement Tapes), the Louvin Brothers’ “The Christian Life,” Merle Haggard’s “Life in Prison” and Woody Guthrie’s “Pretty Boy Floyd” were smart, informed choices but much out of sync with the rock mainstream of 1968 where psychedelia was winding down as sonic innovations from Jimi Hendrix and political unrest in the world at large were surfacing in the harder edge of the music. At the time, the album’s C&W direction doomed the band commercially. Years later, it’s considered one of the most influential albums of all-time, attracting new generations to explore the connections between rock and country music. Excellent outtakes featuring Parsons have been added to the subsequent reissues.

EDITORS’ NOTES

With the addition of Gram Parsons, the Byrds took a definitive step into country music. The group had previously aired this side — Porter Wagoner’s “A Satisfied Mind” on their second album Turn! Turn! Turn!, “Mr. Spaceman” from Fifth Dimension — but they’d never completely submerged themselves into a single genre. Parsons wrote the two original compositions, his sublime signature tune regarding his southern upbringing “Hickory Wind,” and the upbeat pedal-steel driven “One Hundred Years From Now.” For the rest, the group recruited from all over. Dylan’s “You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere” and “Nothing Was Delivered” (which later appeared on his Basement Tapes), the Louvin Brothers’ “The Christian Life,” Merle Haggard’s “Life in Prison” and Woody Guthrie’s “Pretty Boy Floyd” were smart, informed choices but much out of sync with the rock mainstream of 1968 where psychedelia was winding down as sonic innovations from Jimi Hendrix and political unrest in the world at large were surfacing in the harder edge of the music. At the time, the album’s C&W direction doomed the band commercially. Years later, it’s considered one of the most influential albums of all-time, attracting new generations to explore the connections between rock and country music. Excellent outtakes featuring Parsons have been added to the subsequent reissues.

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
63 Ratings
63 Ratings
SeamusStimpson ,

Gorgeous

I'm a bit surprised to see that no one's taken the time to comment on this album. In my eyes, it ranks high in the greatest achivements of the 60s (only comming behind that of Pet Sounds, The Velvet Underground & Nico and In A Silent Way), breaking ground and moving in a progresive, honest and emotional level. The album is brillaint and beautiful, never pretentious or over the top (as many not so humbled ventures into psychedelica were).

Buck Owens ,

Genius

From begining to end this album is incredible... These boys really tapped in on this album... "Sweetheart Of The Rodeo" only one in our life time!! Timeless Classic!

Seven Cities Blues ,

Sweat Heart of the Rodeo

Bravest rock album ever recorder and a commercial disaster during it's time while it was one of the most important albums of the late sixties. Anyone with a cowboy hat and an electric guitar playing country rock owes a nod to this masterpiece. Best listened to in it's entirety.

More By The Byrds

You May Also Like