12 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

While known as a progressive bluegrass band that can set stringed instruments aflame like the best of 'em, Austin's The Greencards aren't just technical marvels; they're also accomplished songwriters, as evidenced by their sixth album, Sweetheart of the Sun. It's a song cycle about movement and water; founding members Kym Warner and Carol Young are Australian transplants. The album finds the band dialing back their penchant for exploratory jamming in favor of a more placid vibe. "Black Black Water" is approaching minimalist for a bluegrass band (brushed drums and plucked mandolins provide the backdrop for Young's languid vocal), but the track's gentle pace is graceful and affecting. Most of the album ("Ocean Floor," "Traveler's Song") is similarly subdued, but the dexterous plucking on tracks like "Wide Eyed Immigrant" and "Paddle the Torrens" prove the band still have chops to spare.

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

While known as a progressive bluegrass band that can set stringed instruments aflame like the best of 'em, Austin's The Greencards aren't just technical marvels; they're also accomplished songwriters, as evidenced by their sixth album, Sweetheart of the Sun. It's a song cycle about movement and water; founding members Kym Warner and Carol Young are Australian transplants. The album finds the band dialing back their penchant for exploratory jamming in favor of a more placid vibe. "Black Black Water" is approaching minimalist for a bluegrass band (brushed drums and plucked mandolins provide the backdrop for Young's languid vocal), but the track's gentle pace is graceful and affecting. Most of the album ("Ocean Floor," "Traveler's Song") is similarly subdued, but the dexterous plucking on tracks like "Wide Eyed Immigrant" and "Paddle the Torrens" prove the band still have chops to spare.

Mastered for iTunes
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Ratings and Reviews

4.7 out of 5

21 Ratings

21 Ratings

Beautiful melodies and harmonies

Wynnsall

Saw Greencards in concert a few years ago (Don Quixotes in Felton/Santa Cruz) and fell in love with them. Each album is different, growing in different directions over time. I already love this one!

Masterpiece!

thismeansyou

Pure magic. This transcendant masterpiece from the Greencards is truly superb. The synergetic energy between artist and producer is overwhelming. The hairs on the back of my neck tell me so.

Exceptional!

Texas_57

I downloaded the album the day it came out but just now had time to really listen to it. May be their best instrumental work yet and Carol's voice is so hauntingly beautiful. Ocean Floor is my choice for best track.

Pair this album with a good bottle of port wine and a fine cigar!

About The Greencards

Texas contemporary bluegrass trio the Greencards are aptly named. After coming to the realization that their English and Australian homelands were not so conducive to their uniquely American style of music, mandolin player Kim Warner, fiddler Eamon McLoughlin, and bass player Carol Young took their love of Ricky Skaggs and Bob Dylan, mixed it with a little Fairport Convention and David Bowie, and began hitting clubs in the Lone Star State. By 2004 they had earned themselves the Best New Band award at the Austin Music Awards, as well as a devoted fan base that included Robert Earl Keen. Their debut, the self-released Movin' On, arrived that same year and managed to sneak its way up the Americana charts, eventually peaking at number five. The grouped signed with Dualtone the following year and went into the studio to begin work on the follow-up. Highly sought-after engineer Gary Paczosa (Dolly Parton) was brought in and Weather and Water was born. Released in June of 2005, it's an impeccably recorded collection of ballads, instrumentals, and harmonious melodies that holds its own against contemporaries like Alison Krauss and Nickel Creek. It was followed in 2007 by Viridian. ~ James Christopher Monger

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