12 Songs, 1 Hour 16 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Because they never had a star to compete with Prince or Rick James or Michael Jackson, The S.O.S. Band ended up being less famous than the songs they produced. Hopefully in time the group will be as beloved and appreciated as their immortal singles, all of which are included on Best of The S.O.S. Band. They rose out of the Atlanta club circuit and quickly rode the popularity of “Take Your Time (Do It Right)” to fame and fortune, but their true creative breakthrough didn’t come until they met Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis in 1983. Jam and Lewis used S.O.S. to test and perfect the production methods that would shape the next 20 years of R&B. At a time when the teenage market was exploding, S.O.S. (under the guidance of Jam and Lewis) made songs that were resolutely grown-up: not just thematically but in terms of tone. Listen to “No One’s Gonna Love You,” “The Finest,” and “Just Be Good to Me”: these songs value luxury over trendiness, patience over peppiness, and the challenge of being old over the excitement of being young. Rarely has pop music carried itself with such seriousness and self-respect.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Because they never had a star to compete with Prince or Rick James or Michael Jackson, The S.O.S. Band ended up being less famous than the songs they produced. Hopefully in time the group will be as beloved and appreciated as their immortal singles, all of which are included on Best of The S.O.S. Band. They rose out of the Atlanta club circuit and quickly rode the popularity of “Take Your Time (Do It Right)” to fame and fortune, but their true creative breakthrough didn’t come until they met Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis in 1983. Jam and Lewis used S.O.S. to test and perfect the production methods that would shape the next 20 years of R&B. At a time when the teenage market was exploding, S.O.S. (under the guidance of Jam and Lewis) made songs that were resolutely grown-up: not just thematically but in terms of tone. Listen to “No One’s Gonna Love You,” “The Finest,” and “Just Be Good to Me”: these songs value luxury over trendiness, patience over peppiness, and the challenge of being old over the excitement of being young. Rarely has pop music carried itself with such seriousness and self-respect.

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