11 Songs, 45 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The 1974 subway hostage thriller The Taking of Pelham One Two Three featured David Shire’s impressive score, a mix of jagged big-band jazz and edgy modernism. The 2009 remake, directed by Tony Scott and starring Denzel Washington and John Travolta, takes a very different musical approach. British composer Harry Gregson-Williams, who counts Shrek and Kingdom of Heaven among his credits, has crafted a score very much of its time, without much reference to the older soundtrack. Gregson-Williams has scored numerous video games, and it’s easy to imagine the remake’s suspenseful music also working in that context. “Something On the Track,” with its chugging rhythm, ominous riffs, and moody keyboard touches, introduces the listener to a tense sound world. On “The Lights Are All Green!,” blistering electric guitar, somber violins, and chattering percussion coalesce to create a sense of urgency, while power electronics conjure men on the move on “Manhattan Bridge.” “…You a Yankee’s Fan?,” with its spare piano and hovering strings, brings the album to a quiet, reflective close.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The 1974 subway hostage thriller The Taking of Pelham One Two Three featured David Shire’s impressive score, a mix of jagged big-band jazz and edgy modernism. The 2009 remake, directed by Tony Scott and starring Denzel Washington and John Travolta, takes a very different musical approach. British composer Harry Gregson-Williams, who counts Shrek and Kingdom of Heaven among his credits, has crafted a score very much of its time, without much reference to the older soundtrack. Gregson-Williams has scored numerous video games, and it’s easy to imagine the remake’s suspenseful music also working in that context. “Something On the Track,” with its chugging rhythm, ominous riffs, and moody keyboard touches, introduces the listener to a tense sound world. On “The Lights Are All Green!,” blistering electric guitar, somber violins, and chattering percussion coalesce to create a sense of urgency, while power electronics conjure men on the move on “Manhattan Bridge.” “…You a Yankee’s Fan?,” with its spare piano and hovering strings, brings the album to a quiet, reflective close.

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