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Tales Don't Tell Themselves

Funeral for a Friend

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Album Review

When a band unleashes a two-part song as the centerpiece of their album, it's a clear sign that the art fix is in — and so is the case with Funeral for a Friend, whose third album, Tales Don't Tell Themselves, is some kind of nautical concept album (just like Modest Mouse's We Were Dead Before the Ship Even Sank, but not really!). Producer Gil Norton certainly provides crucial assistance in giving Funeral's music a cinematic splendor and a glossy pop sheen, turning Tales Don't Tell Themselves into an unapologetic big rock record — big in its sound, big in its hooks, big in its ambitions, big in every way except singer Matt Davies' voice, which is still a thin, tremulous instrument when he sings. He can get swallowed up by the waves of guitars, but that plainspoken voice accentuates the group's post-hardcore roots, which otherwise are quickly receding into the past as of this record. This lack of aggression, whether it's in the buzzing guitars or absent screams, could very well alienate longtime fans, but Funeral for a Friend not only displays an increased sense of ambition on this sweeping great leap forward, they also display a greater sense of accomplishment, as writers and musicians. They may be shedding their old skin here, but the growth is a fascinating thing to witness.

Customer Reviews

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I'm a huge FFAF fan. That doesn't mean I'll like anything they release. Including this album. It's painfully boring and there are no great riffs and lacks the energy and the attitude that I love about all past FFAF albums. This band has two of the seriously best guitarists of their generation and "Hours" proves that. I don't understand why the guitar is so week on this album. However, I lean more towards "aggressive guitar" styles of music and this album seems to be more on the "I can sing pretty/look at me I'm sad/over-produced" style of music, so that may be a reason why I'm not fond of it. I gave it 2 stars because I do seem to enjoy 2 songs, "The Great Wide Open" and "On a Wire."

dont be close-minded :D

i just want to point out that people hate on an album like this just because it is "different" and it is a different sound than the band used to have. Bands like Linkin Park and Fall Out Boy (and FFAF) branch out and try new things instead of making an album that sounds just like the last. Different=not bad. People who write bad reviews because albums are different and because bands change=close-minded and ignorant :D -Colin

Disappointment

The hardcore and edgy inlueneces found on "Casually Dressed & Deep in Conversation" are still gone. The more metalized influence with the more crunchy guitars found on "Hours" is now gone too... and in their place is just run-of-the-mill, dime-a-dozen, choruses and music that could have been written by any number of other mainstream pop-rock bands... nothing that sets this band apart from anyone else. Bummer.

Biography

Formed: 2001 in Bridgend, South Wales

Genre: Rock

Years Active: '00s, '10s

Funeral for a Friend's energized blend of emo, metal, and post-hardcore was created by vocalist Matt Davies, guitarists Kris Roberts and Darran Smith, bassist Gareth Davies, and drummer Randy Richards. The Welsh quintet first appeared in 2002 with a series of EPs and singles, including Between Order and Model, Four Ways to Scream Your Name, and Juneau. Such releases helped land the group on the cover of Kerrang! magazine, a recognition of the band's growing hype that, in turn, earned a record deal...
Full Bio