10 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

A more structured second effort from Count Ossie’s seminal outfit, Tales From Mozambique replaces the off the cuff, lo-fi aesthetic of Grounation with a studio-oriented sound that incorporates more diverse instrumentation and a smattering of dub-like production touches reminiscent of Ras Michaels work with the similarly minded Nyahbinghi group Voices of Negus. Despite its more mannered sound, Mozambique is still an exhilarating blend of roots reggae, haunting Nyahbinghi drumming, and free form jazz improvisation, and stands as the Mystic Revelations most focused recording. The menacing “Wicked Babylon” pits an overdriven organ against an incantatory chorus of singers and percussionists to chilling effect, while the meditative “Sam’s Intro” features some of Cedric Brooks’ most stirring saxophone work. Tales From Mozambique is an utterly unique reggae recording that beautifully illustrates the influence that the centuries old Nyahbinghi percussion style had on the development of Reggae. It is an essential recording for those interested in the history of Jamaican music.

EDITORS’ NOTES

A more structured second effort from Count Ossie’s seminal outfit, Tales From Mozambique replaces the off the cuff, lo-fi aesthetic of Grounation with a studio-oriented sound that incorporates more diverse instrumentation and a smattering of dub-like production touches reminiscent of Ras Michaels work with the similarly minded Nyahbinghi group Voices of Negus. Despite its more mannered sound, Mozambique is still an exhilarating blend of roots reggae, haunting Nyahbinghi drumming, and free form jazz improvisation, and stands as the Mystic Revelations most focused recording. The menacing “Wicked Babylon” pits an overdriven organ against an incantatory chorus of singers and percussionists to chilling effect, while the meditative “Sam’s Intro” features some of Cedric Brooks’ most stirring saxophone work. Tales From Mozambique is an utterly unique reggae recording that beautifully illustrates the influence that the centuries old Nyahbinghi percussion style had on the development of Reggae. It is an essential recording for those interested in the history of Jamaican music.

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3:40
5:40
3:20
3:56
5:00
5:25
3:42
3:41
3:42
5:24

Songs

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