12 Songs, 49 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

It's rarely a surprise when hardcore punk dudes turn out to be acoustic boys at heart, but few are as sure-handed as former Million Dead singer Frank Turner. Tape Deck Heart, his fifth solo album, was recorded in sunny Burbank, Calif., in October 2012, with his road band The Sleeping Souls and producer Rich Costey (Muse, Foster the People). The British singer/songwriter calls this his "breakup album." Sure enough, "Tell Tale Signs" names names, and other tunes resemble an autopsy. Still, the album has a quick humor that makes his romantic troubles more poignant. "One day this will all be over," he sings with desperation and relief on the remarkable "Recovery," which turns into a barroom rocker worthy of Bruce Springsteen, The Gaslight Anthem, or Titus Andronicus. Despite the high-profile producer and the California-studio setting, the album never feels too fussy, too happy, or too slick. "Losing Days" and "The Way I Tend to Be" rock and stay dirty despite Turner's naturally pristine voice. The deluxe version adds five bonus tracks, including the humorously titled "Wherefore Art Thou Gene Simmons?"

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics. Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

It's rarely a surprise when hardcore punk dudes turn out to be acoustic boys at heart, but few are as sure-handed as former Million Dead singer Frank Turner. Tape Deck Heart, his fifth solo album, was recorded in sunny Burbank, Calif., in October 2012, with his road band The Sleeping Souls and producer Rich Costey (Muse, Foster the People). The British singer/songwriter calls this his "breakup album." Sure enough, "Tell Tale Signs" names names, and other tunes resemble an autopsy. Still, the album has a quick humor that makes his romantic troubles more poignant. "One day this will all be over," he sings with desperation and relief on the remarkable "Recovery," which turns into a barroom rocker worthy of Bruce Springsteen, The Gaslight Anthem, or Titus Andronicus. Despite the high-profile producer and the California-studio setting, the album never feels too fussy, too happy, or too slick. "Losing Days" and "The Way I Tend to Be" rock and stay dirty despite Turner's naturally pristine voice. The deluxe version adds five bonus tracks, including the humorously titled "Wherefore Art Thou Gene Simmons?"

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics. Mastered for iTunes
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Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
19 Ratings
19 Ratings
Frank Froese ,

I Expected More

I've been a huge Frank Turner fan since I first heard Love, Ire & Song. I've seen him play live 6 times, and its always a great show. This album, however, pales in comparison to his previous works. There are no real anthems to get your fist in the air, no real excitement. It's a very watered down, emotional version of Frank Turner. It seems like he wrote the entire album for a girl who just broke his heart. It is a very radio-friendly album, and I think he'll find mega success in the USA because of it now. Oh well, I'll always remember the time I saw him play in a bowling alley in Asbury Park, NJ.

KBRI tunes ,

#14 album of the year for 2013

Frank Turner's alt-folk-punk confessionals make him the sentimental Billy Bragg of today. "Recovery" and "We Shall Not Overcome" are my favorites on this one.

bmhesp ,

On A Whim

I picked this up in CD form while on vacation never having heard of him at all, figuring I'd roll the dice. Seven albums later I'm hooked forever :)

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