9 Songs, 33 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The fourth studio album from the Doors, 1969’s The Soft Parade, is arguably their most underrated. Having exhausted all the tunes from their early club days in Los Angeles, the group started from scratch and experimented with orchestration beyond their unorthodox trio of organ, guitar and drums. “Touch Me” has become the radio landmark, however, the horn-powered glee of “Tell All the People” further spotlights singer Jim Morrison’s desire to croon. “Easy Ride” is the Doors cruising on an easy-going country romp. Guitarist Robby Krieger takes a turn at the mike for the tribute to Otis Redding on “Runnin’ Blue,” while Morrison continues his blues-based affections on “Shaman’s Blues” and “Do It.” “Wild Child” comes closest to the group’s psychedelic origins, with “Wishful Sinful” topping off as the band’s most successfully orchestrated pop number. The title track is another of the group’s masterful extended pieces, featuring several disparate parts that flow brilliantly together as one, long poetic whole. The 40th Anniversary Edition includes the essential b-side “Who Scared You,” a horn-based piece of drama that should have made the proper album.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The fourth studio album from the Doors, 1969’s The Soft Parade, is arguably their most underrated. Having exhausted all the tunes from their early club days in Los Angeles, the group started from scratch and experimented with orchestration beyond their unorthodox trio of organ, guitar and drums. “Touch Me” has become the radio landmark, however, the horn-powered glee of “Tell All the People” further spotlights singer Jim Morrison’s desire to croon. “Easy Ride” is the Doors cruising on an easy-going country romp. Guitarist Robby Krieger takes a turn at the mike for the tribute to Otis Redding on “Runnin’ Blue,” while Morrison continues his blues-based affections on “Shaman’s Blues” and “Do It.” “Wild Child” comes closest to the group’s psychedelic origins, with “Wishful Sinful” topping off as the band’s most successfully orchestrated pop number. The title track is another of the group’s masterful extended pieces, featuring several disparate parts that flow brilliantly together as one, long poetic whole. The 40th Anniversary Edition includes the essential b-side “Who Scared You,” a horn-based piece of drama that should have made the proper album.

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