12 Songs, 59 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Peter Frampton’s great success in the ‘70s turned out to be the worst thing that ever happened to him. The legitimate guitar hero was suddenly seen as a pop star and teen heartthrob. This superficial impression haunted the man for years and he has never been able to regain his commercial footing as a serious hard-rock player. But his hardcore fans know the man can flat-out play and 2010’s Thank You Mr. Churchill is an album his fans will surely use as proof that Frampton is still a formidable rocker. From the opening power chords of the title track through the Stones-like shuffle of “Solution” to the purebred arena rock of “I’m Due a You,” Frampton is out to prove that he’s lost nothing with age. The Funk Brothers join him for “Invisible Man” adding their elastic rhythms, while in other spots Soundgarden/ Pearl Jam drummer Matt Cameron adds his firm crunch. “Suite Liberte” is a gentle acoustic piece that showcases Frampton’s broad powers and reminds us of his GRAMMY-winning soundtrack work on Fingerprints. Son Julian adds vocals to “Road to the Sun.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

Peter Frampton’s great success in the ‘70s turned out to be the worst thing that ever happened to him. The legitimate guitar hero was suddenly seen as a pop star and teen heartthrob. This superficial impression haunted the man for years and he has never been able to regain his commercial footing as a serious hard-rock player. But his hardcore fans know the man can flat-out play and 2010’s Thank You Mr. Churchill is an album his fans will surely use as proof that Frampton is still a formidable rocker. From the opening power chords of the title track through the Stones-like shuffle of “Solution” to the purebred arena rock of “I’m Due a You,” Frampton is out to prove that he’s lost nothing with age. The Funk Brothers join him for “Invisible Man” adding their elastic rhythms, while in other spots Soundgarden/ Pearl Jam drummer Matt Cameron adds his firm crunch. “Suite Liberte” is a gentle acoustic piece that showcases Frampton’s broad powers and reminds us of his GRAMMY-winning soundtrack work on Fingerprints. Son Julian adds vocals to “Road to the Sun.”

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About Peter Frampton

Though forever enshrined as the fair-haired boy of 1976’s Frampton Comes Alive!, English singer/guitarist Peter Frampton (born in Kent in 1950) had, by that point, already spent a decade putting in work. He started as a member of psychedelic journeymen The Herd at age 16, joined blues-rockers Humble Pie by 18, and played on sessions with the likes of George Harrison and Harry Nilsson. So maybe it shouldn't surprise anyone that Frampton Comes Alive! was the biggest-selling album ever at that time: Anchored by “Show Me the Way,” “Baby, I Love Your Way,” and “Do You Feel Like We Do” (featuring his memorable talk-box guitar solo), it's at once virtuosic and casual, exploratory and lived-in—a perfect synthesis of rock, pop, and technological innovation that also anthologizes his best songs. After a series of lulls during the late '70s, Frampton reinvigorated his career, playing alongside his childhood friend David Bowie on his 1987 album, Never Let Me Down, and its corresponding Glass Spider Tour. With a great sense of humor and perspective on his legacy—he quipped to CBS in 2012, “You know you’re on the radio too much when even you change the channel”—Frampton went on to play himself on The Simpsons and The Family Guy while continuing to bring his electrifying energy to the stage, touring in 2018 with fellow ’70s rock powerhouse Steve Miller.

HOMETOWN
Beckenham, England
GENRE
Rock
BORN
April 22, 1950

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